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Pros and cons of using daisy chains

Outdoorsman33

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Dec 4, 2019
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Got some climbing sticks and I like the concept of using daisy chain for the sticks instead of clunky straps. Was wondering is there any does and don’t of using daisy chains for climbing sticks and what brand or person do you recommend getting some from?
 

Bigterp

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They work great BUT they will scare the crap out of you from time to time...... if it’s set & just not quite tight enough you can get the stick to get jostled vertically & not be set. But you don’t notice that until the way down. All that to say I still run the original Carl versastraps on all but my top stick. I use a Ros plus the top of my beast stick most of the time & I like the top one rock solid.
 

MathewsMan7

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I like the 7/64 Amsteel daisy chains for my sticks only, not platform. They are plenty strong, fast, and quiet. The major benefit of using them for me is how easily and quickly I can be up the tree using them. Carl’s versa straps were nice and sturdy, but they weren’t as user friendly for me as the amsteel daisy chains...not a huge difference but enough for me to stick with the 7/64 over Carl’s straps.
 

bowhuntr09

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I use 1/8" as I don't think the safe working load on 7/64th is enough. Making them is simple, just make a fid from a cheap knitting needle you can get at Walmart. You can make them for $5 a daisy chain in 1/8" and most people charge $15 for 7/64"

 

Jay_Disarray

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Pros: I like to 1stick, so a daisy is extremely quick and quiet to remove and place. I pull my stick down as i climb upwards from a hanging position, which sets it before i put my weight onto it. no metal, light weight, extremely packable

Cons: I have had it kick out on the bottom of my full sized helium stick, usually when going to step off of it, but it has stayed in place, just kicked out. I'd say a good 90% of the time the loop is not quite in the right place, but you can twist it, or set it to the next loop and pull it down to set it.

Ive tried the regular straps, amsteel daisies and cam cleats, i prefer the daisies.
 
Last edited:

Outdoorsman33

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Dec 4, 2019
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They work great BUT they will scare the crap out of you from time to time...... if it’s set & just not quite tight enough you can get the stick to get jostled vertically & not be set. But you don’t notice that until the way down. All that to say I still run the original Carl versastraps on all but my top stick. I use a Ros plus the top of my beast stick most of the time & I like the top one rock solid.
What’s the difference between the versa strap and the regular like hawk helium straps? I apologize if this is a simple answer I’ve hunted from a climber mostly first year using sticks.
 

Outdoorsman33

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Dec 4, 2019
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Pros: I like to 1stick, so a daisy is extremely quick and quiet to remove and place. I pull my stick down as i climb upwards from a hanging position, which sets it before i put my weight onto it. no metal, light weight, extremely packable

Cons: I have had it kick out on the bottom of my full sized helium stick, usually when going to step off of it, but it has stayed in place, just kicked out. I'd say a good 90% of the time the loop is not quite in the right place, but you can twist it, or set it to the next loop and pull it down to set it.

Ive tried the regular straps, amsteel daisies and cam cleats, i prefer the daisies.
What’s causing the slack to make the stick kick out with daisy chains though? Is just from the loops not lining up right and just that much length is making it have that much slack. That’s the main issue I don’t want to have happen with no rappelling gear.
 

Jay_Disarray

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What’s causing the slack to make the stick kick out with daisy chains though? Is just from the loops not lining up right and just that much length is making it have that much slack. That’s the main issue I don’t want to have happen with no rappelling gear.
its only pulled tight against a tree by the downward pressure and the loops on the ends of the daisy, instead of tight parallel with the tree trunk like what a cam strap would do. i think that something to do with it, but im not 100% on that, maybe someone with more engineering experience would know better
 

Outdoorsman33

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its only pulled tight against a tree by the downward pressure and the loops on the ends of the daisy, instead of tight parallel with the tree trunk like what a cam strap would do. i think that something to do with it, but im not 100% on that, maybe someone with more engineering experience would know better
How long have you been using your set of daisy chains?
 

Bigterp

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its only pulled tight against a tree by the downward pressure and the loops on the ends of the daisy, instead of tight parallel with the tree trunk like what a cam strap would do. i think that something to do with it, but im not 100% on that, maybe someone with more engineering experience would know better
That’s it exactly, you’re not locked on & cinched tight with a fairly horizontal strap angle to the tree. Your picking the tightest fit & weighting the stick to set it. Any upward pressure can unseat it. That’s why I prefer a super aggressive standoff.
 

Jay_Disarray

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since last fall, on a pretty consistant basis, when available i climb on average 3x a week. muscle memory and a plan is my goal so i climb fairly often
 

raisins

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I use 1/8" as I don't think the safe working load on 7/64th is enough. Making them is simple, just make a fid from a cheap knitting needle you can get at Walmart. You can make them for $5 a daisy chain in 1/8" and most people charge $15 for 7/64"

I believe size "purple" from wally world is the best for 7/64 or 1/8 amsteel. Just file the cut inside and out.
 

DE bow hunter

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Jan 9, 2020
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New to saddle hunting. This is my first year. I got the new HH 20” and using 7/64” amsteel daisy chain. I have heard they need to be stretched after splicing and that can cause slack. Is there any truth to that?
 

Jay_Disarray

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Oct 7, 2019
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New to saddle hunting. This is my first year. I got the new HH 20” and using 7/64” amsteel daisy chain. I have heard they need to be stretched after splicing and that can cause slack. Is there any truth to that?
Yea, I think there is a little stretch in the daisy depending on what size your daisy is and your weight. It stretches after a good amount of weight gets set on it, so you can do it right in your backyard real quick
 

Outdoorsman33

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since last fall, on a pretty consistant basis, when available i climb on average 3x a week. muscle memory and a plan is my goal so i climb fairly often
Did you make your own daisy chains or buy them from someone?
since last fall, on a pretty consistant basis, when available i climb on average 3x a week. muscle memory and a plan is my goal so i climb fairly often
 

raisins

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New to saddle hunting. This is my first year. I got the new HH 20” and using 7/64” amsteel daisy chain. I have heard they need to be stretched after splicing and that can cause slack. Is there any truth to that?
I have read here that the woven daisy chains have some initial stretch (artifact of the weaving process or maybe they are not using amsteel/dyneema/UHMWP). I have amsteel daisy chains. The amsteel will not stretch under your body weight to a degree you could notice. The individual lock you are in might need to "set" (similar to tightening a knot), but I have not noticed that at all. Amsteel is similar/same as modern low stretch bow string material.
 

bj139

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That’s it exactly, you’re not locked on & cinched tight with a fairly horizontal strap angle to the tree. Your picking the tightest fit & weighting the stick to set it. Any upward pressure can unseat it. That’s why I prefer a super aggressive standoff.
Are you saying you SHOULD or SHOULD NOT get the strap as tight as possible before setting? It is not clear.
 

Jay_Disarray

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Are you saying you SHOULD or SHOULD NOT get the strap as tight as possible before setting? It is not clear.
i think what he means is theres 2 ways to set a stick, both of which work.

a strap will hold tight horizontally to the tree, and use the horizontal pressure to hold it where it is.
a daisy isnt locked tight horizontally, like a strap would be, but uses the downward pressure on the stick to hold it in place, so there is a bit more slack in the system. a more aggressive stand off can help minimize that by locking into the tree a bit better
 

Bigterp

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i think what he means is theres 2 ways to set a stick, both of which work.

a strap will hold tight horizontally to the tree, and use the horizontal pressure to hold it where it is.
a daisy isnt locked tight horizontally, like a strap would be, but uses the downward pressure on the stick to hold it in place, so there is a bit more slack in the system. a more aggressive stand off can help minimize that by locking into the tree a bit better
That’s it! A mechanical strap connection has much less slack. A daisy chain or versa strap is only tight-ish & weight “sets” the stick. The liability in the second scenario, no matter how tight you get the daisy chain/ versa strap there’s a little more slack in that system. Any upward movement can cause the stick to not be seated, just grazing your to as you climb up to the next position can do it. I’m ok with all that, but that’s my acceptable level of personal risk & wanted the OP to factor that in his decision.
 
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