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Why carry so much crap?

Bwhana

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2017
Messages
1,279
Location
Hickory, NC
I recommend everybody do this once or twice.

Go on a short hunt. Take your weapon and your stand. Nothing else. Nope, not even that! Leave it all.

Write down the things you miss. My pack is virtually empty.
Did that several times, literally walked in and left the ammo behind with the other stuff and didn't realize it till I got back out. Made the rifle lighter though! I have also been known to carry just 1 in the chamber, and maybe one in the mag to shave weight, but have needed just one more a few times doing so.
 

dblomberg4

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2018
Messages
262
Location
St. Paul, Mn
I recommend everybody do this once or twice.

Go on a short hunt. Take your weapon and your stand. Nothing else. Nope, not even that! Leave it all.

Write down the things you miss. My pack is virtually empty.
No Way i'm heading to a tree without some toilet paper at a minimum... I'm too old and, well, let's leave the rest of that alone...
 

NORKALNIMROD

Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2019
Messages
47
DanO pretty much nailed it.
For me where I hunt and roam determines what I carry. The far north, the Rocky’s, the Great Basin with its many mountain ranges and numerous other areas out west, and I have no doubts there are areas east of the Rocky’s as well require one brings with them what might be needed. The vast majority of the time most of the stuff is not needed. Those are the good outings. However if it’s needed and you don’t have it, it might be your last safari or with luck maybe just a little bit of an inconvenience.
In the mountain states it is smart to always be prepared for an extended stay.
 

always89y

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2019
Messages
403
Im the guy that brings a lot. Death before discomfort, pack lite, freeze at night...all that Jazz. My "A Lot" is probably lighter than most stand hunters. I bring the TP, rubber gloves,water, extra biners, extra belay device, some extra string, my long rope and my short tether and a back up amsteel linemans, back band, some lite camera gear (GoPro) along with the usuals (gear strap, hooks, knee pads or tree pad, stick and saddle). Im still less than 20 lbs and the comfort of knowing I have it is worth the extra weight to me. Im not from fast stock, but we can carry a lot a long way!
 

bj139

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2019
Messages
884
Location
SE PA
I recommend everybody do this once or twice.

Go on a short hunt. Take your weapon and your stand. Nothing else. Nope, not even that! Leave it all.

Write down the things you miss. My pack is virtually empty.
I think this guy @Nutterbuster has some pretty good ideas.
Mountaineer coil of rope slung diagonally over one shoulder.
Preset paracord loop already in the tree. I left it there on Tuesday.
Throwbag and throwline clipped to carabiner in case I feel like moving.
Platform clipped to carabiner. Do I need this?
Pull down paracord in a pocket.
Ascender and descender already clipped to harness.
Bow strap? or rig up a hanger from pull down paracord or tail end of climbing rope.
Carabiners to rig up things I didn't bring.
Food? I can live off my fat reserves for a least a day. Gotta carry them anyway.
I will try this next hunt.
 

Aeds151

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2018
Messages
1,328
Does anyone think about a first aid kit?


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Vtbow

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2018
Messages
3,233
Does anyone think about a first aid kit?


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I carry dermabond, a few steri strips, iodine wipes, benedryl, small amount of duct tape, coyple bandaids, and electrical tape
As an ex wilderness emt, I can do pretty much anything needed with that small kit.
 

Jrybicki

Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2019
Messages
60
I need to go through my pack again... seems really heavy for whats in it. I carry a bottle of permethrin in case the thermacel takes a crap or I forget to bring extra pads/butane, face paint if its too hot for my face mask, 2 headlamps in case 1 dies, 8' hooyman in case I need to trim a shooting lane, tree umbrella for the rain, field dressing knife, range finder, grunt call, and estrus can.
 

Aeds151

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2018
Messages
1,328
I carry dermabond, a few steri strips, iodine wipes, benedryl, small amount of duct tape, coyple bandaids, and electrical tape
As an ex wilderness emt, I can do pretty much anything needed with that small kit.
Same, as a WFR, I noticed that no one mentions first aid but I guess if you fall from saddle you are toast anyway. At least if your kit is still 20ft up in your pack. An Israeli Bandage is crucial as well.


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Vtbow

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SH Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2018
Messages
3,233
Same, as a WFR, I noticed that no one mentions first aid but I guess if you fall from saddle you are toast anyway. At least if your kit is still 20ft up in your pack. An Israeli Bandage is crucial as well.


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I'm usually more worried about rolling an ankle on the way In or out, or slipping with a razor sharp knife while gutting an animal in the freezing cold. Feel like the probabilities of those scenarios are much higher than falling out of s tree. .. hopefully :)
 

Aeds151

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2018
Messages
1,328
Ya god forbid. I was glad to have a kit when my helium sticks tore several holes in my hands.


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BuffaloBill

Member
SH Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2019
Messages
87
Location
Indiana
I feel like my Horn Hunter G3 pack is too big for shorter trips. I got one of the new "vintage" Trophyline pouches and have been putting essentials like my release, mikweed, head strap, head lamp, etc. in there without weighing it down too much. I wear my saddle in and use a Versa strap to carry my sticks over my shoulder. Later in the season I may use a pack. But I'm also hunting in the Midwest and I'm not hiking miles in. Usually close enough I can leave stuff in my vehicle and go back to get it if I kill something. I got a saddle to carry less. Not to fill the weight saved with extra things.
 

KyleND

Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2019
Messages
61
For what my family time allows for me it's mostly morning hunts I can get away with.. that being said and living in ND it seems like one day I need short sleeves with a thick coating of permetherin . After that what seems like only one day (autumn does not seem to exist some years) I need cold weather gear packed and that means weight. I try to cut weight where I can but if I cant be warm/stay long enough in the tree to see the deer I am after what's the point. I take the extra pounds when needed and try not to stress(sweat) when doing so. Love the packs with waist belt.
 

Stykbow1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 2, 2014
Messages
436
Location
New Jersey
Really depends on where you're hunting.
  • Out back behind the house? No pack needed - pockets work for everything.
  • Several hours away at a remote property I have permission to hunt on? I'll be sitting most of the day so I bring a backpack for all my food and water.
  • Public land canoe trip or scouting/hunting all day? I'll have a backpack with food, water, survival stuff, clothes, field dressing stuff, etc.
  • Out West hiking all day in the mountains? I'll have a whole lot more with me - all of the above plus everything needed to quarter/de-bone and pack out. Additional survival stuff to be able to spend the night if needed.
I agree with Dano it depends on the situation and where you are hunting. I take out stuff or add stuff based on seasonal needs all the time or the different areas that I hunt. I agree It never hurts to reevaluate what you take versus what you need but each hunting situation is unique based on a number of factors.

I have noticed a dramatic increase in the importance that many saddle hunters place on the weight of the equipment that they carry, this may be as some have suggested, due to the increase in hunters videoing their hunts requiring to somehow lighten the load. For others, I think it is a carry-over from a backpacking or mountaineering mindset where weight considerations are of paramount importance, due to the nature of the activity.

Depending on where I'm hunting I try to tailor the importance weight has based on how it will impact the hunt. If I'm hunting close to the vehicle I may leave items back at the truck because I can come back and get them quickly and easily if needed. If I am going to be hunting in a wilderness area or all-day hunt I will take extra items that I feel I might need.

Again it doesn't hurt to reevaluate what's in your pack but ultimately what's absolutely important will always be based on the individuals' wants and needs in different hunting environments.
 

neonomad

Active Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2019
Messages
155
I feel like my Horn Hunter G3 pack is too big for shorter trips. I got one of the new "vintage" Trophyline pouches and have been putting essentials like my release, mikweed, head strap, head lamp, etc. in there without weighing it down too much. I wear my saddle in and use a Versa strap to carry my sticks over my shoulder. Later in the season I may use a pack. But I'm also hunting in the Midwest and I'm not hiking miles in. Usually close enough I can leave stuff in my vehicle and go back to get it if I kill something. I got a saddle to carry less. Not to fill the weight saved with extra things.
And I feel like my G2 is a little too small for midwestern whitetail.
 

neonomad

Active Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2019
Messages
155
I carry dermabond, a few steri strips, iodine wipes, benedryl, small amount of duct tape, coyple bandaids, and electrical tape
As an ex wilderness emt, I can do pretty much anything needed with that small kit.
I also carry several long releasable zipties, they’re super handy in general and I suspect would be a decent and fast tourniquet.
 

Nutterbuster

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2017
Messages
4,811
Location
Where the skys are so blue!
I carry dermabond, a few steri strips, iodine wipes, benedryl, small amount of duct tape, coyple bandaids, and electrical tape
As an ex wilderness emt, I can do pretty much anything needed with that small kit.
Honest question. In your mind, how valuable is a first aid kit for somebody who hunts one to two miles back from the truck, and lives 30 minutes from a large city with several hospitals?

My thought is any injury I sustain is likely to fall under one of two categories:

Trivial enough to "shake it off" and either patch it at home or drive to hospital. Last year I had a mishap that resulted in 4 stitches to my ankle. Sure, a butterfly bandage would have helped, but so did applying pressure with a t shirt and then hobbling out. I've also cut myself gutting before and am still here.

Severe enough that a first aid kit don't do ya no good. Fall 30ft or shoot yourself, and a butterfly bandaid and some antiseptic don't help ya none.

I'm not trying to be tongue-in-cheek, and I'm not opposed to carrying something. But I'm not walking around with a splint and quick-clot acting like I'm gonna patch myself up after fighting a zombie bear.
 

Rmurraymd

New Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2019
Messages
23
Getting out there with kids work etc like most of you is a challenge. I’ll forget something so I actually have a fairly loaded pack and wear a Ghillie suit with pockets. Every year all in same places and often carry way more than I need but bc it’s always the same (give or take) I can grab and go and adjust once out there. Takes too long to re pack and change stuff for weather NY state rain ladder stand day stillhunt AM sor eve sit etc. I gotta be simple even if it means more of a work out.
 
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