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Dedicated Coyote Arrow?

BTaylor

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Oct 23, 2019
Messages
1,900
Location
Central Arkansas
Well...what is a pod
Sorta like a little short footer for an arrow that had a roll back sleeve of sorts on it. think the neck part of a balloon before you blow it up. You put this white powder stuff vets used to put critters to sleep with under the rubber sleeve. When you shot something the sleeve would roll back and dispense death very effectively. Really all that was required was enough penetration to engage the pod and the deer would be down in 50-60 yards from what I was always told. Gutshot, backstrapped or through the shank didnt matter, they were not going to run very far at all.
 

NMSbowhunter

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SH Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2022
Messages
1,418
Yes, that's it. A friends dad used them back in the 80's. He told me about an incident where he hit one in the lower hind leg with a pod arrow and the deer was down within sight. Whatever that stuff was I sure didn't want anything to do with it.
 

Marmuzz

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SH Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2021
Messages
640
Location
Pennsylvania
So, veering far off topic, my apologies to the OP, but I gotta ask about this pod business.

Never heard of such a thing. So, was this legal for hunting? Killing an animal by chemical exposure (…sounds like poisoning)? Would anyone actually eat a deer after such a kill?

I can see the advantage for hunting tougher game that you are (less? Not?) likely to eat and just need to kill quick, like problems bears or wild pigs. My impression though is wild pigs were less of an issue years ago, and if it were really critical to reduce the population, a bow isn’t the primary weapon I’d think of unless it’s an urban area.

I’m struggling to understand it.
 

SNIPERBBB

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Joined
Feb 19, 2020
Messages
780
Location
SE Ohio
So, veering far off topic, my apologies to the OP, but I gotta ask about this pod business.

Never heard of such a thing. So, was this legal for hunting? Killing an animal by chemical exposure (…sounds like poisoning)? Would anyone actually eat a deer after such a kill?

I can see the advantage for hunting tougher game that you are (less? Not?) likely to eat and just need to kill quick, like problems bears or wild pigs. My impression though is wild pigs were less of an issue years ago, and if it were really critical to reduce the population, a bow isn’t the primary weapon I’d think of unless it’s an urban area.

I’m struggling to understand it.
Its an interesting question as to the legality of poisoned arrows. In Ohio, its specifically mentioned that you cannot use poisoned arrows to take deer, turkey or waterfowl. Poison generally isnt allowed for anything outside of mice, rats, voles and moles here. Maybe you could use it on coyotes here but not quite sure how that would work out for you if you're deer hunting and a warden sees you with a poisoned arrow in your quiver...
 

WISCO

Active Member
SH Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2022
Messages
108
Location
Northern Wisconsin
I always have a Junker arrow in my quiver to take a shot at something besides a deer. I'm not shooting that new $25 dollar arrow at a yote. Early season they are not prime and not worth a dime.
 

Marmuzz

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2021
Messages
640
Location
Pennsylvania
Its an interesting question as to the legality of poisoned arrows. In Ohio, its specifically mentioned that you cannot use poisoned arrows to take deer, turkey or waterfowl. Poison generally isnt allowed for anything outside of mice, rats, voles and moles here. Maybe you could use it on coyotes here but not quite sure how that would work out for you if you're deer hunting and a warden sees you with a poisoned arrow in your quiver...
Oh no I’m not thinking whatsoever of using such arrows ever. Just curious about the concept.
 

BTaylor

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Oct 23, 2019
Messages
1,900
Location
Central Arkansas
So, veering far off topic, my apologies to the OP, but I gotta ask about this pod business.

Never heard of such a thing. So, was this legal for hunting? Killing an animal by chemical exposure (…sounds like poisoning)? Would anyone actually eat a deer after such a kill?

I can see the advantage for hunting tougher game that you are (less? Not?) likely to eat and just need to kill quick, like problems bears or wild pigs. My impression though is wild pigs were less of an issue years ago, and if it were really critical to reduce the population, a bow isn’t the primary weapon I’d think of unless it’s an urban area.

I’m struggling to understand it.
Yes it was legal back in the day. The chemical was what vets used to put animals to sleep for surgeries. I dont know for sure but I assume a diluted version that could be given through IV. Pods just carried the straight powdered chemical. Never heard of anyone having issues eating the deer killed with them but folks were dang careful about handling that stuff around broadheads. Remember hearing lots of discussions about whether it was ethical or not back then because hunters didnt have to wait for a clear shot at vitals, just a clear shot at the animal, any part of it. I dont recall ever hearing of anyone not recovering a deer shot with one but it probably happened if the pod failed to open or the hunter shot an old pod that the medicine was not good any longer. Also have to keep in mind this was pre-compound through the early years of compound bows before it was outlawed everywhere. Nearly all of the guys I knew that used them were or had been tournament archers and if they had a baseball sized clear hole to the deer, they could put an arrow in 'em.
 
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