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new observation

TFL

Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2017
Messages
78
last week while getting to my stand I put my hand, on a barb wire fence, pushed down on the fence with my palm and went over it
it is a low spot on the fence, but I have to give it a push to get my short legs over
walked to my stand and hunted the morning.
well wouldn't you know 4 hrs later a small buck came down the trail and when he hit the fence, he seemed concerned
backed up, smelled the wire, backed up again, smelled the wire a third time, got nervous, looked around and then walked off in the opposite
direction.
the sense of smell is amazing,
watch what you touch,
 

Jtaylor

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2018
Messages
1,503
I've seen the same thing. I use my stabilizer on my bow or stirrup on the xbow to push the fence down.
 

JFin15

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2019
Messages
382
Location
Central AL
Seen this many many times.

I've gotten to where I don my scentlok gloves before walking in. Or if I'm not going in for a hunt, I'll wear rubber kitchen gloves so I can touch what I want without as much concern. I'm also very conscious of what my clothes rubs against.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
 

Harleycharlie

Member
SH Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2016
Messages
89
Location
Louisiana, Ohio
When I first really got into deer hunting, I drank the scent free kool aid. Wow I got to say it was a lot of work. Everyone knows the run down ....... dress out in the deer woods. Scent free shower before going to hunt. Tons of other stuff to be as scent free as one can be. Today I don’t worry about it. I’m not saying it doesn’t work. I’m saying it made deer hunting miserable for me and I would still get busted. Just my opinion but if you sit and watch deer you learn it’s hard to beat a deers nose. So many times I have seen deer just grazing relaxed until they hit where I stepped or touched something. I think it’s hard for us to relate to , because we use our eyes more so than our nose. My wife , dog and I live in our camper most of the year because of my job. Anyway I have seen my dog go to the door and sniff go lay back down. Other times he sniffs at the door freaks out barking , runs to the back of the camper to look out the rear window. 100% of the time when he does this deer will be feeding under the apple tree 30 yards behind our camper. I maybe wrong but I understand deer can smell better than a dog. I see a lot more deer now that I know don’t walk or touch things that I shouldn’t. Don’t get up wind from deer if possible. It makes a difference for me.
 

Allegheny Tom

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2018
Messages
4,926
Location
Western Pennsylvania
Somehow I always lose my footing and need to grab onto trees for support when I am walking by treestands I find in the woods. Weird.
I seldom walk through the woods without pruners in my hand. Yeah, I use them to prune stuff out of my way, but I also use them to steady myself when walking. Instead of reaching out to a tree with my hand, I just plant the tip of the pruner against the tree. Not only do I leave less odor behind, I also walk much quieter because I'm walking with better control and balance.

I'll never forget the 1st time I learned the lesson to not touch anything that you don't have to. My access trail was recently raked for quieter approach. It needed to be because the stand was located very close to a bedding area. I walked in for an afternoon hunt and discovered a thick blanket of fresh, dry leaves had just fallen in the area of final approach. There was no way to walk quietly. So I pulled out my judo arrow and raked my way over the last 75 yards or so where the leaves were. I was mimicking the sound of turkeys scratching. The last 10 yards of approach to the tree was to walk down a fallen tree trunk. As I walked silently down the log, I could hear deer walking just on the other side of a "wall" of cover which blocked our vision of each other. Half way down the log, I started to lose my balance so I reached out to a sapling and steadied myself with one thumb...just one single thumb for 1 second...a freshly showered thumb.
I made it to the preset tree and scurried up. An adult doe must have heard something that peaked her curiosity and she came over to investigate. Yep, she walked right up to sniff that single thumb print on that tiny sapling.

Think about it...
When law enforcement dusts for fingerprints, they are essentially looking for the oil deposits left by the tips of fingers. That oil is also odor.
It kills me when I watch a hunting show and the "experts" walk up to a rub or overhanging scrape branch and touch it. Utterly stupid! There's no reason to touch stuff like that.
 

Hall17

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2021
Messages
507
Location
Pennsylvania
Think about it...
When law enforcement dusts for fingerprints, they are essentially looking for the oil deposits left by the tips of fingers. That oil is also odor.
It kills me when I watch a hunting show and the "experts" walk up to a rub or overhanging scrape branch and touch it. Utterly stupid! There's no reason to touch stuff like that.
[/QUOTE]

So true. I have not been great with not touching things but I never get too close to a scrape or rub for that reason. Great story on the thumbprint though, that is crazy. I guess I don't give them enough credit.
 

colin.704

New Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2018
Messages
30
I seldom walk through the woods without pruners in my hand. Yeah, I use them to prune stuff out of my way, but I also use them to steady myself when walking. Instead of reaching out to a tree with my hand, I just plant the tip of the pruner against the tree. Not only do I leave less odor behind, I also walk much quieter because I'm walking with better control and balance.

I'll never forget the 1st time I learned the lesson to not touch anything that you don't have to. My access trail was recently raked for quieter approach. It needed to be because the stand was located very close to a bedding area. I walked in for an afternoon hunt and discovered a thick blanket of fresh, dry leaves had just fallen in the area of final approach. There was no way to walk quietly. So I pulled out my judo arrow and raked my way over the last 75 yards or so where the leaves were. I was mimicking the sound of turkeys scratching. The last 10 yards of approach to the tree was to walk down a fallen tree trunk. As I walked silently down the log, I could hear deer walking just on the other side of a "wall" of cover which blocked our vision of each other. Half way down the log, I started to lose my balance so I reached out to a sapling and steadied myself with one thumb...just one single thumb for 1 second...a freshly showered thumb.
I made it to the preset tree and scurried up. An adult doe must have heard something that peaked her curiosity and she came over to investigate. Yep, she walked right up to sniff that single thumb print on that tiny sapling.

Think about it...
When law enforcement dusts for fingerprints, they are essentially looking for the oil deposits left by the tips of fingers. That oil is also odor.
It kills me when I watch a hunting show and the "experts" walk up to a rub or overhanging scrape branch and touch it. Utterly stupid! There's no reason to touch stuff like that.
big fan of pru ers also
 
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