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Amsteel or Paracord?

kblack222

New Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2018
Messages
16
Location
S.E. Michigan
Hello, i am totally new to Saddle hunting and to Forums. This is actually my first post ever. I have my 1st Saddle (a Kestrel) on order & am very “Geeked!”. I love reading all the info on this forum. However, i cant find the answer to one of my questions..
I have been bowhunting for 34 years and have relied heavily on Paracord over the years for almost everything. All this talk about climbing ropes and Amsteel has got me wonderig if there is a better choice? I use paracord for hanging up my gear in trees, hoisting my gear up, hanging meat quarters and even as a 3rd arm while gutting animals. I dont like how the outter sheath can bunch up seperaty from the inner core and think a more traditional rope of similar diameter might be better.
Could this be Amsteel?
Please explain to me why everone uses Amsteel and not paracord??
Thank you!!!
 

JBDaddy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2018
Messages
671
Location
Lenawee, MI
All these guys are Amsteel reps making commissions. J/K :)

I was gonna list some paracord/amsteel differences and cite sources, but I found someone else's description that probably does it better: http://www.ramblinjim.com/articles/everything-you-wanted-to-know-about-paracord/ (Search for "Amsteel" - no quotes - for the relevant answers to your question)

Short version: Amsteel doesn't stretch, floats, has way higher load capacity. Doesn't knot as well as paracord though, costs a bunch more.

For gear hoist ropes and non-safety bearing uses, I'm sticking with the paracord. For a lineman's belt or anything else holding me from falling to an early death, Amsteel or rated climbing rope.

Also: Welcome!
 

redsquirrel

Administrator
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SH Member
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Feb 19, 2014
Messages
13,503
Location
NJ
Welcome to the site! For the uses that you described, the only real advantage of amsteel is that is is super light to carry. Amsteel is very strong for such a small package. It is also going to be significantly more expensive than paracord. So while you would be able to use amsteel for that stuff, you might be better off looking at some of the different climbing related ropes. Zing it is popular and might work better for what you're looking for, but there are other options too.
 

ImThere

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Joined
Oct 20, 2015
Messages
6,427
Location
Lewisburg, TN
For the uses you describe there is no advantage. IMHO.
Use Amsteel where you need to do heavy lifting and can splice.


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kblack222

New Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2018
Messages
16
Location
S.E. Michigan
Thank you very much!!!
I now realize i probably posted this question in the wrong location, but you still answered my questions!!!
Thank you!!!
 

g2outdoors

Well-Known Member
Vendor Rep
Joined
Oct 3, 2014
Messages
7,431
Location
Savannah, GA
Here is a great article about Dyneema (Amsteel Blue).

One line I really liked: "Dyneema is a very impressive fiber when it comes to technical specifications. It's the strongest fiber in the world by weight, has virtually no stretch, has incredible chemical resistance, excellent UV resistance, and extremely good abrasion resistance"
 

BassBoysLLP

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Sep 28, 2014
Messages
3,096
It's very difficult to develop a negative argument for amsteel. I'm likely gonna cave this year and switch to a woopie as I prefer an adjustable bridge.

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Ontariofarmer

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Dec 25, 2015
Messages
5,154
It's very difficult to develop a negative argument for amsteel. I'm likely gonna cave this year and switch to a woopie as I prefer an adjustable bridge.

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Just did the same thing We must be among the few that like an adjustable bridge


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Last edited:

ImThere

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Joined
Oct 20, 2015
Messages
6,427
Location
Lewisburg, TN
I’m think about having an adjustable bridge on my Kestrel for the first few uses just to see what length I need. Then I will probably make a fixed Amsteel bridge.


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g2outdoors

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Oct 3, 2014
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7,431
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Savannah, GA
There's really no disadvantage to having an adjustable/whoopie sling bridge other than a very small weight penalty (1/2 oz?), and a tail end that you have to deal with. Neither of those are deal breakers IMO.
 

Ontariofarmer

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Dec 25, 2015
Messages
5,154
There's really no disadvantage to having an adjustable/whoopie sling bridge other than a very small weight penalty (1/2 oz?), and a tail end that you have to deal with. Neither of those are deal breakers IMO.
An adjustable bridge has some advantages too.
  1. Comfort can vary ... from sit to sit and varying the length changes the comfort level
  2. A short bridge for repelling.
  3. Very little movement compared to adjusting the tether if you need more slack or less for a shot. If you lean back against your backstrap it takes the pressure off the bridge so you can adjust it.
  4. I think I am one of the few that likes it adjustable and now I have a whoopie sling and amsteel it is even better. . There are no carabiners on my bridge either.
 

BassBoysLLP

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Sep 28, 2014
Messages
3,096
An adjustable bridge has some advantages too.
  1. Comfort can vary ... from sit to sit and varying the length changes the comfort level
  2. A short bridge for repelling.
  3. Very little movement compared to adjusting the tether if you need more slack or less for a shot. If you lean back against your backstrap it takes the pressure off the bridge so you can adjust it.
  4. I think I am one of the few that likes it adjustable and now I have a whoopie sling and amsteel it is even better. . There are no carabiners on my bridge either.
What size did you go with?

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