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Being mobile and ground scent

Fl Canopy Stalker

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SH Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2021
Messages
330
sometimes you bumble onto a set, and cover it with scent. Sometimes you just can’t help it.

two things have improved my success immensely - one general and one specific.

generally now, I scout from start of season to end of season. I only set hunt when I’ve got really good odds of killing a deer. (Usually, sometimes though I am weak and hunt when I shouldn’t). I basically walk all over. The first time I set foot on a property this is pretty random. Once I learn it I become much more precise in my routes, and what I’m looking for. But generally, because I am spending most of my time in the field scouting, I have become pretty good at knowing when I am in or about to be in “good bow hunting set” locations. And I generally slow down in these types of areas so I’m not backtracking or missing details. I’ll typically use maps and knowledge of terrain to plan sections of the walk with hunting in back of my mind. This mindset generally keeps me from just bumbling. But I do try to randomly bumble around early, and get more precise as season(s) go on.

the more precise thing I do, is how I operate once I get on sign. Because I’m already moving slower(because I’m not panicking about having a place to sit that evening, I don’t care if I hunt or not), stumbling into hot sign usually isn’t a surprise. I generally know where it is gonna be, and then as I get into it I’m moving slow. Then I go into “plan every step, don’t backtrack” mode. I immediately look within 50 yards of me in every direction for a set(ground or tree). I’m looking ahead to see where trails or funnels lead. I’m looking for feed trees, or blow downs or bedding cover. I’m looking for anything that tells me the fresh sign I’m seeing is close to the deer that made it. Most times I’m accessing from the wrong direction, and no matter what I do, ground scent or my scent from walking(that’s blowing to the deer where they are)is going to be my downfall. That’s the nature of hunting, and why there’s millions of deer.

but sometimes I get it right going in, and that’s the sets I make on the spot. If I don’t get it right the first time, I typically will move on and hunt somewhere else or continue scouting. I’ll note the spot, and better ways to access it for future hunts this season or next.


Go fast when you’re generally assessing a whole property. go slow when you’re scouting specific locations. Go even slower when you’re scouting a specific set. Having a constant scouting mindset has done wonders for me.

note - if you hunt the same property year in and out, you’ll obviously not be doing as much scouting. I like new dirt, if ya couldn’t tell.
I feel like your approach is similar to mine. Especially because you cannot always control how you access an area. Deer tend to stay down wind and face opposite that way they can smell scent behind them and see what’s up ahead. Moving slowly and making sure you can clear lanes for access limits your exposure. And honestly ground scent tends to go cold after a few hours. Great post and approach man
 

CooterBrown

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SH Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Messages
765
How does the moisture that comes out of your lugs as you breathe fall to the ground without having some scent to it and remain there for several hours even if you wear rubber boots and don't touch anything? I had a place where I had to walk across a green field to get to my stand years ago and no matter what I did with rubber boots and scent spray every time a deer would cross my path in they would lock up and go on alert. Sometimes they would cross it and go on feeding but a lot of the time they would exit the area. The good thing was I always had a shot opportunity before they crossed my path in. But during the rut I was holding out for a buck and hoping the does just kept on feeding in the field to attract the bucks but when they blow out of there it doesn't leave much hope for a buck to show up.
 

Fl Canopy Stalker

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SH Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2021
Messages
330
How does the moisture that comes out of your lugs as you breathe fall to the ground without having some scent to it and remain there for several hours even if you wear rubber boots and don't touch anything? I had a place where I had to walk across a green field to get to my stand years ago and no matter what I did with rubber boots and scent spray every time a deer would cross my path in they would lock up and go on alert. Sometimes they would cross it and go on feeding but a lot of the time they would exit the area. The good thing was I always had a shot opportunity before they crossed my path in. But during the rut I was holding out for a buck and hoping the does just kept on feeding in the field to attract the bucks but when they blow out of there it doesn't leave much hope for a buck to show up.
Do you wear face covers when hunting and scouting? If so the moisture is caught by that. Regardless, the moisture droplets would be carried by the air and would not come directly down to the ground (think of the concepts of social distancing for COVID). They would more likely float to nearby leaves branches ect. Again I am not saying boots eliminate all odors, I am saying odors dissipate in time. And since you cannot completely stop them from occurring, that they are a natural part of what makes hunting a challenge. It wouldn’t be much fun if you walked 100’ into the woods and the animals just laid down and said shoot me, now would it?
 

CooterBrown

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SH Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2020
Messages
765
Do you wear face covers when hunting and scouting? If so the moisture is caught by that. Regardless, the moisture droplets would be carried by the air and would not come directly down to the ground (think of the concepts of social distancing for COVID). They would more likely float to nearby leaves branches ect. Again I am not saying boots eliminate all odors, I am saying odors dissipate in time. And since you cannot completely stop them from occurring, that they are a natural part of what makes hunting a challenge. It wouldn’t be much fun if you walked 100’ into the woods and the animals just laid down and said shoot me, now would it?
I don't wear mask all the time( I'm not a liberal that believes mask are the best thing since sliced bread LOL) its hot down here in Alabama in October and also don't wear one walking in.
 

Bowmanmike

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SH Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2019
Messages
921
How does the moisture that comes out of your lugs as you breathe fall to the ground without having some scent to it and remain there for several hours even if you wear rubber boots and don't touch anything? I had a place where I had to walk across a green field to get to my stand years ago and no matter what I did with rubber boots and scent spray every time a deer would cross my path in they would lock up and go on alert. Sometimes they would cross it and go on feeding but a lot of the time they would exit the area. The good thing was I always had a shot opportunity before they crossed my path in. But during the rut I was holding out for a buck and hoping the does just kept on feeding in the field to attract the bucks but when they blow out of there it doesn't leave much hope for a buck to show up.
I think deer smell the disturbance of the ground even if you leave no scent. No other animal has feet as big as ours and puts as much pressure on one foot,maybe a bear comes close. But they smell the mixing of the layers of dirt and crushed grass stems etc. Of course they also smell things on the surface of things if you leave that.
 

Weldabeast

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Joined
May 23, 2019
Messages
5,259
Location
Northeast Florida
@Fl Canopy Stalker I used to preset stuff on public but I have come to learn it's almost pointless mainly do to the weather. Seems everytime I had something ready to go when quota day finally shows up and I get there it is either flooded or trees down all over or the road to get here is impassable...the hurricanes always mess me up. I've only had another hunter bother me maybe 2 times on lazy close to the road hunts....they don't want to go where I'm going. Did/do u experience the same?
 

Fl Canopy Stalker

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SH Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2021
Messages
330
@Fl Canopy Stalker I used to preset stuff on public but I have come to learn it's almost pointless mainly do to the weather. Seems everytime I had something ready to go when quota day finally shows up and I get there it is either flooded or trees down all over or the road to get here is impassable...the hurricanes always mess me up. I've only had another hunter bother me maybe 2 times on lazy close to the road hunts....they don't want to go where I'm going. Did/do u experience the same?
I experienced it with flooding more so than with downed trees. That’s why I stopped post season scouting and set ups because it’s usually feb or March which is dry season and the tides are unusually low that time of the year. I explained that to my friend who started hunting last year. He was doing everything he saw on you tube and then come September half his locations were under 10” of water or more. I do set up presets usually late July or early august that way it is realistic for September conditions. The exceptions being hurricanes lately seem to only hit us in September or October. And I’ve had several hunts messed up from Irma and Dora. I didn’t even attempt for Matthew because I had to work through it and my family evacuated to northern Ga. I rarely hunt close to the road though. I’m more of a park close to a creek or marsh bank and paddle my kayak to a spot kind of guy
 

Fl Canopy Stalker

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2021
Messages
330
I don't wear mask all the time( I'm not a liberal that believes mask are the best thing since sliced bread LOL) its hot down here in Alabama in October and also don't wear one walking in.
I’m in Florida so I totally understand the heat. But I also take into account the less clothing you have on, the more chance for leaving scent and plus the gnats and mosquitoes in the Florida marshes will carry you away. I can swipe them off my arms and before I make it from my elbow to my wrist, I’m completely covered again. For that reason alone long sleeves and the head pieces are a must for me
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2018
Messages
91
On the ground scent I dont like it. I was hunting a spot on public was about a mile and a half back hunting had a nice 15 inch wide 9 point coming towards me wind was right everything perfect he made it to a point and locked up just went alert looking left and right. He stood there a minute then turned and went the way he came from. I couldn't understand why. Around 9:45 that morning I watched a guy walk out in the same place. He had parked on the side of the interstate(which is illegal unless vehicle issues). I made sure to go a little further in the next time just in case. If I go over sign I'll just post up closer rather than let them cross my scent.
 

Rg176bnc

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Joined
Mar 23, 2014
Messages
319
I hunt like this alot. Like some others have said I slow way down. At the first promising sign Im tree shopping. Before I check out the first tree Im looking for another. If your deer are hunted hard ground scent is everything and the first time is the best time to get it right.
 
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