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Dog treat recipe?

Steely Ty

Member
Joined
Aug 28, 2019
Messages
43
Location
Cleveland, OH
My dog keeps sitting here watching me eat this delicious venison brat. I feel bad I can’t share it with her because it has fat in it and she gets pancreatitis episodes from time to time.
Do you guys have any good dog treats you make out of venison? I’ve made just pure jerky before for her but that seems to go pretty quick.


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Nutterbuster

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Oct 12, 2017
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6,097
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Where the skys are so blue!
My mother called me out of the blue one day and asked how many deer I thought I could shoot this year. She's NEVER had ANY interest in hunting. Isn't an anti, but hates that me and my father obsess over it. I cheekily replied, "a lot." She told me that was good, because her stupid little lap dog had tummy issues and she was looking into making him organic food. Then she paused.

I told her I would feed her and the rest of my family all the deer meat they wanted, but that I'd be jingle-jammed before I fed venison to a dog. Any animal that will eat turds and its own vomit can get by just fine on Ole Roy. She didn't like that.

I like animals as much as the next guy. But I don't feel even a tiny bit bad eating whatever I want in front of the little freeloaders. If I was going to "treat" a dog to venison, I'd just make up some bone broth and pour a bit over their kibble when I was feeling benevolent.
 

BuckTown

Active Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2019
Messages
167
Location
Central VA
After watching some of the United Bloodtracker's videos talking about dogs liking liver treats, I think I may try dehydrating some deer liver next year. Just a thought...
 

Nutterbuster

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Oct 12, 2017
Messages
6,097
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Where the skys are so blue!
After watching some of the United Bloodtracker's videos talking about dogs liking liver treats, I think I may try dehydrating some deer liver next year. Just a thought...
Mom wanted liver and hearts. I told her that was the best part, but maybe I could squeeze some pellets out of the intestines for the little butt-dragger.
 

Jtaylor

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Joined
Dec 25, 2018
Messages
693
Location
Nebraska
The pups get the raw bones when I can keep an eye on 'em but the meat goes in my belly. Makes for a good laugh seeing a butterball of a bulldog carrying around a hooved deer leg through the yard.
 

Steely Ty

Member
Joined
Aug 28, 2019
Messages
43
Location
Cleveland, OH
Unfortunately my dog can’t get by on ole Roy. That would just end up in a couple thousand dollar vet bill again making that some real expensive food. My dog goes everywhere with me fly fishing, dove hunting, work etc. she deserves some good treats from time to time. I probably talk to the dog more than the wife actually.


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mike7tcu

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May 27, 2020
Messages
30
I’ve baked just straight up trim for the pup till it was like jerky. He doesn’t seem to mind chewing on sinew. I figure it’s better than feeding the coyotes with it. I used to put a little salt on it, but was advised against it apparently it’s bad for them.
 

Nugget

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Nov 3, 2018
Messages
314
After watching some of the United Bloodtracker's videos talking about dogs liking liver treats, I think I may try dehydrating some deer liver next year. Just a thought...
I dehydrated a liver for my dog last season. It was a big hit. Just run the dehydrator in the garage. Dehydrated liver is not a pleasant smell!
 

Hunter260

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SH Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2019
Messages
238
Location
Columbia, MO
I’m a 3rd year veterinary student, so this is one topic I feel I have some expertise in. It sounds like your dog has had some issues with pancreatitis in the past, so what you feed them is very important. Unlike people, dogs are healthiest when they do not have a largely varied diet. Many health issues come from frequent changes in food, or feeding food that is low in quality and can’t be absorbed by your dog. The best treat you can give your dog is the food they’re already on. If your vet has your dog on a special diet for their health issues then this is even more important. A lot of people fool their dogs into thinking they’re getting treats by putting some of their food in a treat bag or box and getting them real excited when they give them some. Another way is to change the shape of the food into a treat shape like this recipe.

A lot of people think that since dogs came from wolves, and wolves ate deer, then dogs should be able to eat deer. For some dogs this is true, but a lot of dogs just have very sensitive stomachs and one or two meals of something different can literally be fatal.
 

MaxJac

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Joined
Mar 13, 2019
Messages
283
Location
Sandhills, NC
I use the bones to make venison stock, which I then use to make a sauce for the back strap. My dog loves those bones after I cooked them for hours. Best treat. In the past, I also put the trim in a crockpot and used that as dog food. She loves it, but the farts are horrible
 

boyne bowhunter

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SH Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2016
Messages
3,245
Location
Michigan
Mom wanted liver and hearts. I told her that was the best part, but maybe I could squeeze some pellets out of the intestines for the little butt-dragger.
You can't hardly pull my 8month old lab off a pile of deer "pellets". I think he thinks they're M&M's. :tearsofjoy::tearsofjoy::tearsofjoy:
 
Last edited:

Weldabeast

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Joined
May 23, 2019
Messages
2,995
Location
Northeast Florida
I use the bones to make venison stock, which I then use to make a sauce for the back strap. My dog loves those bones after I cooked them for hours. Best treat. In the past, I also put the trim in a crockpot and used that as dog food. She loves it, but the farts are horrible
Cooked bone will splinter and can cause injury or death.....I lost a dog to splintered bone after she tore open the trash bag while I was asleep....she was DOA when I woke up. I'm always extra careful with cooked bone after that....
 

rhagenw

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SH Member
Joined
May 4, 2020
Messages
59
My dogs have no health issues and they are free range country farm dogs so I just freeze raw scraps that have to much sinew in them and give them periodically, and I let them gnaw on the bones in the yard...but learn to keep the hide away from them...they will crap out (try too anyways) what looks like jute rope
 

Steely Ty

Member
Joined
Aug 28, 2019
Messages
43
Location
Cleveland, OH
I’m a 3rd year veterinary student, so this is one topic I feel I have some expertise in. It sounds like your dog has had some issues with pancreatitis in the past, so what you feed them is very important. Unlike people, dogs are healthiest when they do not have a largely varied diet. Many health issues come from frequent changes in food, or feeding food that is low in quality and can’t be absorbed by your dog. The best treat you can give your dog is the food they’re already on. If your vet has your dog on a special diet for their health issues then this is even more important. A lot of people fool their dogs into thinking they’re getting treats by putting some of their food in a treat bag or box and getting them real excited when they give them some. Another way is to change the shape of the food into a treat shape like this recipe.

A lot of people think that since dogs came from wolves, and wolves ate deer, then dogs should be able to eat deer. For some dogs this is true, but a lot of dogs just have very sensitive stomachs and one or two meals of something different can literally be fatal.
I’m a 3rd year veterinary student, so this is one topic I feel I have some expertise in. It sounds like your dog has had some issues with pancreatitis in the past, so what you feed them is very important. Unlike people, dogs are healthiest when they do not have a largely varied diet. Many health issues come from frequent changes in food, or feeding food that is low in quality and can’t be absorbed by your dog. The best treat you can give your dog is the food they’re already on. If your vet has your dog on a special diet for their health issues then this is even more important. A lot of people fool their dogs into thinking they’re getting treats by putting some of their food in a treat bag or box and getting them real excited when they give them some. Another way is to change the shape of the food into a treat shape like this recipe.

A lot of people think that since dogs came from wolves, and wolves ate deer, then dogs should be able to eat deer. For some dogs this is true, but a lot of dogs just have very sensitive stomachs and one or two meals of something different can literally be fatal.
That’s great information! We are very strict on her diet with only giving her the same food. We tried to switch once to save money which lasted a month unTil he had a flare up. We found out it’s mostly fat content, so I figured deer should be fine


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ZHunter

Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2020
Messages
48
Location
56501
Like the vet student said I would be careful of what you feed the dog. We have 4 dogs, 2 that live outside and 2 pampered little ones. Our two outside dogs can eat anything and be fine it seems, probably due to all the horse **** they eat. The two inside will get horrible upset stomachs if they get into the venison, especially the show dog. We found out that venison is a lot like lamb and is a "hot" protein. We feed a beef based food with is a more "mild" protein and it even helps our 13 year old dog keep up with the youngsters.
If you would like some cheap healthy treats I would recommend Charlie Bear brand treats. They're a low calorie crunchy treat that has limited and quality ingredients. A friend of mine that trains and shows malamutes swears by them. Another treat that is very good quality and a little more expensive is Grandma Lucy's treats. They're all organic and human food grade quality. And yes, I've eaten them. I work at a kennel and we have free samples of them for both humans and dogs. They look like teddy bears and have better ingredients than animal crackers. More than once I've had these treats in my pack for a snack while hunting lol
 

CrackbottomLouis

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SH Member
Joined
Aug 31, 2019
Messages
320
Location
Georgia
I slice deer liver really thin add a touch of salt and dehydrate for my dogs. Not sure how that would be for dogs prone to pancreatitis though. My beasts sure do love it.
 
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