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Proper foot wear for back country

denots

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2017
Messages
2,088
Location
Denham Springs, Louisiana
Not to cause argument, but I disagree with the Gore-Tex lined Theory. My standard work boot is a Redwing leather boot that has a Gore-Tex liner. The worst thing in the world when you work on your feet all day is to start today off with wet feet. Since I cut grass for a living until about 9:30 or 10 in the morning all the yards have wet grass from the Dew. Before I started wearing these particular boots with a Gore-Tex liner after just a month my boots no matter how much oil them allowed my feet to get wet first thing in the morning. This may not be that big of a deal if you just walking a mile into the woods and a mile back out to make a hunt but when you put 10+ miles a day on your feet, having wet Feet sucks. I have used just about every waterproof membrane item of clothing I can find from gloves, to jackets, to bibs, and the only ones that I find that breathe are Gore-Tex. Gore-Tex will not allow water droplets to pass through but water vapor is allowed to permeate through the fabric and Escape. After several sets of soles on my work boots and when the leather begins to severely crack, my feet still stay dry. Obviously being on my feet this much my feet sweat a lot and are not perfectly dry but nowhere near wet like if you wore tennis shoes, or rubber boots, or just plain leather boots with no Gore-Tex liner. I'm speaking from a hundred percent experience I have been doing this for a very very long time. If you want to see how wet your feet can actually get from wet grass take a walk through some tall grass first thing in the morning and to top it off, add a weed eater throwing it all back into your legs and feet. Say what you will, but I wear all my clothes Gore-Tex lined for hunting purposes(if I need them to keep me dry). The worst thing in the world to me is to step in a big ol water puddle on the way back to your stand and have water seep into your boot. That's way different than having a moist sock from sweat. Even if you change your socks they continue to soak up the water that penetrated the boot from the outside.

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Last edited:

bigjoe

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2015
Messages
2,618
Location
VA
Not to cause argument, but I disagree with the Gore-Tex lined Theory. My standard work boot is a redhead leather boot that has a Gore-Tex liner. The worst thing in the world when you work on your feet all day is to start today off with wet feet. Since I cut grass for a living until about 9:30 or 10 in the morning all the yards have wet grass from the Dew. Before I started wearing these particular boots with a Gore-Tex liner after just a month my boots no matter how much oil them allowed my feet to get wet first thing in the morning. This may not be that big of a deal if you just walking a mile into the woods and a mile back out to make a hunt but when you put 10+ miles a day on your feet, having wet Feet sucks. I have used just about every waterproof membrane item of clothing I can find from gloves, to jackets, to bibs, and the only ones that I find that breathe are Gore-Tex. Gore-Tex will not allow water droplets to pass through but water vapor is allowed to permeate through the fabric and Escape. After several sets of soles on my work boots and when the leather begins to severely crack, my feet still stay dry. Obviously being on my feet this much my feet sweat a lot and are not perfectly dry but nowhere near wet like if you wore tennis shoes, or rubber boots, or just plain leather boots with no Gore-Tex liner. I'm speaking from a hundred percent experience I have been doing this for a very very long time. If you want to see how wet your feet can actually get from wet grass take a walk through some tall grass first thing in the morning and to top it off, add a weed eater throwing it all back into your legs and feet. Say what you will, but I wear all my clothes Gore-Tex lined for hunting purposes(if I need them to keep me dry). The worst thing in the world to me is to step in a big ol water puddle on the way back to your stand and have water seep into your boot. That's way different than having a moist sock from sweat. Even if you change your socks they continue to soak up the water that penetrated the boot from the outside.

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Wet feet suc.. I do not care for them in the summer and hate them in the winter.

A trick in the winter time in a survival situation if you are on the move and you have rubber boots on is too fill your boots with water, especially if you have rubber boots on. Your body will heat the water as long as your moving. The rubber boots act as a wetsuit and your feet will warm.


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Homebrew454

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2017
Messages
1,431
Location
Wisconsin
If you guys are having trouble with cold feet like I always did, get a pair of the Arctic Shield boot blankets and some Hot Hands. I wear my light boots to the tree so my feet don't sweat then throw those things on with hand warmers on the top of each boot. Feels like my feet are propped up by the fire place! A little extra weight to carry but warm comfy feet are completely worth it to me.
I've been doing the same. Looks like Arctic shield now sells a neoprene boot as well with their retain technology. I had thought they went out of business a few years back.

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donnieballgame

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Joined
May 31, 2017
Messages
1,872

tam9492

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2018
Messages
552
Location
Central PA
I've got hundreds of miles on a pair of Vasque Sundowners. Absolutely love them. Sturdy but light. This year, I'll be pairing them with Western Mountaineering Expedition booties. 800 fill goose down with Gore windstopper. I'll pull my uninsulated Vasques off and put these on after climbing up. Probably change socks. They weigh next to nothing, and the folks at WM suggested that one pair of heavy wool socks paired with these booties would keep me cozy in extreme temps. They aren't cheap, but I found a pair for about $60 on eBay.

http://www.westernmountaineering.com/down-garments/booties/expedition-booties/
 

Jajtner01

Member
Joined
Apr 2, 2014
Messages
91
Location
San Diego, CA
I went with the Solomon X-Ultra Mid last year and loved it. Enought support for a 50 to 60 pound pack, but feels like a running shoe. The other part was the moreno wool socks. Definately a must have. They aren't insulated though so in the cold they probably won't work well.
 

sureshotscott

Moderator
Staff member
SH Member
Joined
Jul 18, 2017
Messages
1,867
Location
SE MI
I'm happy with Danner Acadias (insulated gore-tex) for temps above freezing. Not happy with my current giant heavy cold-weather boots (can't recall manufacturer) but if I see the Lacrosse Aerohead 7mms on sale I'll be pulling the trigger.

Picked up a boot-dryer contraption last year. That was a good investment.
 

Obession114

New Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2018
Messages
19
scarpas and a pair of gaiters is what i use for mountain terrain.. Extra socks are a must and the boots are very warm themselves ive sat in -2 in the stand with just a pair of merino wool socks and my feet stayed warm... But i have to use non scented antiperspirant on my feet and change socks once im in the stand Once my feet get damp forget it!
 

DannyAttacksTheMountain

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2018
Messages
714
scarpas and a pair of gaiters is what i use for mountain terrain.. Extra socks are a must and the boots are very warm themselves ive sat in -2 in the stand with just a pair of merino wool socks and my feet stayed warm... But i have to use non scented antiperspirant on my feet and change socks once im in the stand Once my feet get damp forget it!
This is my plan for this year


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jlh42581

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2014
Messages
454
Location
PA
Im glad to see this sub forum kicking!

Currently I am running an ASOLO fugitive in a 9.5 WIDE . This boot runs narrow so if you have a wide foot at all, get a wide. Its stiff but not so stiff you cant use it. It will require you break it in, its not a boot youll be able to put on and feel great day one.
 

DannyAttacksTheMountain

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2018
Messages
714
only thing that ive found works for me my feet stay warmer with just one good pair of socks and the scarpas then they do in any of my pac boots guess its cause my feet sweat like crazy
Been trying this and my feet still get cold but not terrible. Started changing socks once I get to where I’m hunting and adding in some “hot hands” toe warmers. Hopefully this holds up when it gets colder


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Lad42

New Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2018
Messages
1
Hey all,

Just curious if anyone can recommend a good boot for those long tracks out to the hunting spots in the mountains?

The ol rubber boots just are not the best for the terrain.

Looking for something good for mountainous terrain as well as a good cold weather boot.

Thanks all,

DATM


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If still looking, check out the men’s beartooth mid boot made by Schnee’s in Montana. I love mine and they were comfy out of the box and they were on sale so may still have them on sale since the new version came out.
 

rnomad

Member
Joined
Dec 7, 2014
Messages
71
Check out Hoffman boots they have a winter pack boot with a removable ski liner single and double linned boots I have both they are heave but my feet never get cold and the liner can be changed or pulled out to dry I use them all day long in the winter to climb tress
 

rnomad

Member
Joined
Dec 7, 2014
Messages
71
This is what has screwed me in the late season. I’ve tried all kinds of sock combos with my 1200 gr insulate rubber boots and no luck. Toes froze


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foe my the rubber boots make my feet sweat bad and constrict the blood flow in your feet I wear a Hoffman boot they offer a winter boot with a removable ski boot liner single and double lined and they have duel steel shanks for those gaffs or standing on steps I also unlace my boots when I get on stand it lets the blood flow in your feet better it feels like some one turned on the heat in your boots

Hoffmanboots.com
 

LockStock&Arrow

Active Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
Messages
105
I have Hanwag Mountain Light for about 10 years... Have done everything I have asked for in a boot in the mountains . Would highly recommend.

Next I’m going to give the Lathrop and Sons custom boot a try for ha ha’s.
 

Jartiam

New Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2018
Messages
28
Location
Batesville, Ar
I trek around A LOT, and I’ve ran with the Nike sfb’s for the last couple of years. Non insulated, waterproof 8”. I love them, very comfy and let the ol dogs breathe..
 

jlh42581

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2014
Messages
454
Location
PA
I trek around A LOT, and I’ve ran with the Nike sfb’s for the last couple of years. Non insulated, waterproof 8”. I love them, very comfy and let the ol dogs breathe..

A non insulated boot goes against everything we have been told but it definitely works most times. I think insulation can be your own enemy. I have a pair of 400g danners and feel like by the time my feet are that cold its time to leave anyhow.
 

Jartiam

New Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2018
Messages
28
Location
Batesville, Ar
Yea
A non insulated boot goes against everything we have been told but it definitely works most times. I think insulation can be your own enemy. I have a pair of 400g danners and feel like by the time my feet are that cold its time to leave anyhow.
Yes sir, I agree 100%. I may cheat a tad and use hot hands insole warmers from time to time..but, my feet don’t sweat. That’s when things can get cold. I used to wear insulated all the time and every time I would stop, I’d get cold feet. It’s counter intuitive, but that doesn’t happen anymore.
 

William74080

Active Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2019
Messages
134
This is my first post so thought I'd fire this thread back up. No ones mentioned anything about boots that military use. Never been in service but would hope our troops are taken care of especially in the foot department. Must also say extremely impressed with the comradery within this group. Hope to meet some of you soon.
 
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