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The Hunting Public Deer School?

elk yinzer

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A lot of the free information out there is junk. Just look around SH and you'll see a lot of absolute nonsense. Deer don't act the same in every scenario. Folks who have hunted a while and have good success use their experience to make decisions. How close to push to a bed, where to find beds, thermals for different scenarios, the list goes on. I still say that a new hunter could spend 80 dollars on a lot worse things. It's a lot harder to pick the good info from the bad when you're a novice. I think OP will be happy paying to shorten that learning curve, even if it's marginal.
I agree most are geared toward individual styles, properties, experiences etc. I see that all the time with THP, they are very Midwest centric and very visual hunters. What they consider "thick stuff" is dang near wide open woods here. They have tons of open areas on public they consistently see adult deer, that just doesn't happen here. Coincidentally that also makes for better filming setups. I don't watch all their stuff as it gets a little too vloggy for me, but they seem to struggle when they go south where like here that visual glassing compenent is far less viable.

I have a good window into their potential clientele here as I have a few friends I've mentored into adult onset hunters and I've struggled most teaching them woods skills, stuff I just grew up with and take for granted. I've avoided pushing too many internet resources to them and encouraged just taking the time to go into the woods and figure it out themselves. To some degree that seems to be working, and there seems to be a linear relationship between the time commitment and results for sure. One of them though lives in Philly, doesn't get out of the city too much and seems to be stagnating a bit. I might push him to check out THP school to see if it shorthens his learning curve. He's been out on his own for 3-4 years and hasn't been putting it together but at least he is still into it.
 
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Aeds151

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I’ve had more success this year than ever by throwing out everything I know about map scouting, bedding areas, food sources and all that crap. Here’s the easiest way to get on a deer you want to kill

1. Go look at things until you see a deer.
2. Bring your bow next time you go there.
3. Shoot the deer.
Dude so true. Last year I just told myself to hike with my rifle, no sitting, until I jumped a big buck just so I could say I saw one and if I got a shot, well then thats pretty neat. I jumped one from his bed around 1600 and didnt want to shoot at his ahnoose while he ran directly away from me down hill. 4 days later I went back in around 1200 with saddle and watched as he came right back to that bed/area.


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Aeds151

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Aug 16, 2018
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They don't know how to hunt Alabama or Mississippi deer, so my only suggestion would be to not take the course if you live and hunt in one of those two states. They really do have a lot of combined experience, so if you are a new deer hunter and don't have a lot of experience or a good mentor, it might be a good option to add to your ever growing boots on the ground. It sounds like they have more than enough material for you to read and learn from. I am sure you would take something from the course, and though I do hunt in Alabama and joke about that, I am sure I would learn plenty too. $80 seems reasonable. Let us know how it goes.
Dont forget Arkansas. I just dont think their tactics pan out in the south. I dont follow them but I dont think they make annual trips to the South for a reason hahaha.


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Arkie

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Dont forget Arkansas. I just dont think their tactics pan out in the south. I dont follow them but I dont think they make annual trips to the South for a reason hahaha.


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I like them and watch their stuff, don’t get me wrong, but good luck “glassing” and spot & stalking in AR when you’re rolling your ankle on rocks on the hillside every third step and can’t see in the woods past 30 yards.


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Nutterbuster

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Where the skys are so blue!
You nailed it. Especially this part

they are very Midwest centric
and this one

a few friends I've mentored into adult onset hunters and I've struggled most teaching them woods skills, stuff I just grew up with and take for granted.
THP seem to be quite capable in their biome. But they and most other famous hunters are famous because they're good hunters AND they're hunting in a good area that allows them to produce results noticeably more impressive than baseline. THP would not achieve the commercial success they have found if they were plying their trade in states where bucks can die of old age and never hit 130". That's an important thing to keep in mind. If you're looking for "advanced" tactics and you don't share their biome, there's a reduction in value. They're teaching midwestern hunting. At least it's midwestern public land instead of midwestern outfitter.

But, I think they'd be an awesome way to learn some fundamentals if you were coming into it without having grown up in a hunting tribe. I have friends who didn't and it definitely shows. They hunt some goofy places for goofy reasons. And if you live in the areas they hunt (or plan on driving there) they're probably the best source of information going right now.

Honestly, if you think they can teach you something, they probably can.
 

TNbowhunter

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Mar 12, 2019
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Middle Tennessee
THP seem to be quite capable in their biome. But they and most other famous hunters are famous because they're good hunters AND they're hunting in a good area that allows them to produce results noticeably THP would not achieve the commercial success they have found if they were plying their trade in states where bucks can die of old age and never hit 130".
Well by golly, they must’ve been reading your posts about hunting where there are plentiful big deer!
 

elk yinzer

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State College, PA
AND they're hunting in a good area that allows them to produce results noticeably more impressive than baseline.
And it's literally their job so they put in the time, probably 5-10x what the typical "dedicated" hunter puts in a year. That factor is yuuge.

Not gonna lie I slightly envy parts of their life and wish I had taken a gap year after high school to just be a hunting/fishing bum. But it's gotta be a grind for them, they do it pretty much year round. Heck by December every year I am ready to put away the bow and dust off the fishing poles. And they ain't kids anymore, it's going to be brutal being on the road like that when they start making babies if that's in their future.
 
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Nutterbuster

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Well by golly, they must’ve been reading your posts about hunting where there are plentiful big deer!
Smart people have been doing that thing for decades. Fortunately for us it's easier and cheaper to do now than it's ever been.
And it's literally their job so they put in the time, probably 5-10x what the typical "dedicated" hunter puts in a year. That factor is yuuge.

Not gonna lie I slightly envy parts of their life and wish I had taken a gap year after high school to just be a hunting/fishing bum. But it's gotta be a grind for them, they do it pretty much year round. Heck by December every year I am ready to put away the bow and dust off the fishing poles. And they ain't kids anymore, it's going to be brutal being on the road like that when they start making babies if that's in their future.
Yep. Mike Waddell got a divorce over (among other things) his time on the road. WHW mentions his wife not loving him mentioning how many nights he spent in the ole truck bed. Infalt talks about the hurt feelings from missing Thanksgiving and other holiday meals.

2 things folks can learn from that. 1, you probably can't achieve that level of success and hold down a "normal" life. 2, the people who put in that kind of effort really are experts. They can't help but be after logging those hours.
 

Aeds151

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Smart people have been doing that thing for decades. Fortunately for us it's easier and cheaper to do now than it's ever been.

Yep. Mike Waddell got a divorce over (among other things) his time on the road. WHW mentions his wife not loving him mentioning how many nights he spent in the ole truck bed. Infalt talks about the hurt feelings from missing Thanksgiving and other holiday meals.

2 things folks can learn from that. 1, you probably can't achieve that level of success and hold down a "normal" life. 2, the people who put in that kind of effort really are experts. They can't help but be after logging those hours.
10,000 hours is all it takes.


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