• The SH Membership has gone live. Only SH Members have access to post in the classifieds. All members can view the classifieds. Starting in 2020 only SH Members will be admitted to the annual hunting contest. Current members will need to follow these steps to upgrade: 1. Click on your username 2. Click on Account upgrades 3. Choose SH Member and purchase.
  • We've been working hard the past few weeks to come up with some big changes to our vendor policies to meet the changing needs of our community. Please see the new vendor rules here: Vendor Access Area Rules

The Sladder… ABSOLUTE BEST Climbing method

I still have yet to use another climbing method this season. The sladder is simply too effective to get up and down 0-15’, quietly, and fast.

My JX3 top stick gets me an additional 2-3’, or more if i add a 1 or 2 step aider.

So far I haven’t needed to get higher than 18’.



There’s still scenarios where I’d need a different climbing method. Hasn’t stopped me from being effective this year
 
I still have yet to use another climbing method this season. The sladder is simply too effective to get up and down 0-15’, quietly, and fast.

My JX3 top stick gets me an additional 2-3’, or more if i add a 1 or 2 step aider.

So far I haven’t needed to get higher than 18’.



There’s still scenarios where I’d need a different climbing method. Hasn’t stopped me from being effective this year
Are you rappelling down?
 
Christmas Sale 15% Off! Last Chance To Get The Sladder Climbing System Before Christmas For That Special Someone or Just Treat Yourself. Hurry, Sale Ends Sunday 12/17/23! We will ship as quickly as possible to try to get your order to you before Christmas but don't delay and get your Sladder today!
 
Does anyone have photos or can explain how this system detaches from the tree when you are using it?
 
We had the pleasure of meeting so many of you at the Great American Outdoor Show. Thanks for stopping by the booth to say hello and for giving us your support. There were quite a few that tried the Sladder at the show with us providing guidance on how to use the system and saw instant success, even mentioning to us how easy it was afterwards. We are looking forward to the next show and meeting even more of you.
 
Hey guys, I have received several queries and have seen several forum comments about using Daisy Chains from other manufacturers on the Sladder Climbing System. We do not recommend using Daisy Chains on the Sladder Climbing System that are not purchased from Grayskwerel Outdoors. Our Daisy Chains are designed specifically for use with the Sladder Climbing System. When attaching the daisy chain to the hook, you want to put it on the first loop that fits easily onto the hook so that it attaches firmly to the tree but also releases properly. The loops are designed to give you 1.5 inches of adjustment for each loop. Most Daisy Chains manufactured by other companies are designed to go over a 2 inch diameter button often used on climbing sticks which require loops that are at least 2.5 inches long and are too long for use on the Sladder Climbing System.
 
Hey everyone , the Sladder Climbing system is currently undergoing strength testing… 3,560 lbs before it started stripping the bark!! 5 tests rung to rung broke from 6,100 to 6,630 lbs (safety percentages to be applied for final safety rating coming soon. Additional test results coming soon!!
 

Attachments

  • IMG_8082.jpeg
    IMG_8082.jpeg
    75.7 KB · Views: 27
  • IMG_8083.png
    IMG_8083.png
    1.7 MB · Views: 28
First practice run using the @kyler1945 method this weekend. Thought I'd report to help me process my thoughts and see who else is giving this a go.

For those not familiar, the method involves only 2 lengths of the Sladder (initial attachment and one pull up and attach, with no release of the initial) plus a JX3 wide top platform stick and in my case a 3-step aider.

Pros:
1) Plenty of height. 6ish + 6ish + 5ish = feet at 17-18. I don't see a need to hunt any higher than that.

2) Love climbing with an LB, and not having to sit and raise a tether constantly (1-sticking alternative). Safety concerns acknowledged.

3) Very light, packable and easy to deploy/stow.

4) Looks fast/efficient. I was taking my time due to the first climb, but I could already see how this is very likely going to get quite quick and easy.

Cons:
1) LB combined with feet on webbing raises the pucker factor quite a bit. Straight, easy tree and good technique is key. I used Moab hiking boots and it took me a bit to get good at forcing the ball of my foot into the tree to help pull the Sladder out. It definitely works when you get the hang of it, but it takes some focus.

2) Foot loops seemed a bit small. More fiddle factor than I expected getting boots in and out. I wear size 11 and would like these loops to be a bit bigger. I also found it strange to transition from toes in on the steps to ankles in on they loops, but was pleased with how solid and comfortable it is once in the loops.

3) Daisy chains seem too small. I chose what I consider a standard saddle hunting tree (basketball size). The standard chains did the job, but I was using the tie off method and there wasn't much left to work with to complete the truckers hitch. I got it done, but I can't see why these aren't a foot or so longer. I don't need huge extensions, just material to cover standard hunting. Right out of the bag the first thing I thought was how short the chains looked.

4) Not having a constant lifeline to the ground was a little unnerving. Maybe I've just gotten too used to that with 1-sticking. Maybe it was just being new to the method. I definitely felt like "Man, if something goes wrong I sure wish I had my rappel setup ready to go". Related, I felt like at the top I would just like to rappel down and pack up rather than un-tether and LB down again. Granted, going down was easy peasy, and packing up was simple, but I don't struggle with or dislike packing up rappel gear. I'm not sure that I won't keep that option in combo with this method. However I'd like to carry only one of the two items. Problem is I like climbing up one way better, but the other for coming down. Hmm...

Sent from my SM-S901U using Tapatalk
 
First practice run using the @kyler1945 method this weekend. Thought I'd report to help me process my thoughts and see who else is giving this a go.

For those not familiar, the method involves only 2 lengths of the Sladder (initial attachment and one pull up and attach, with no release of the initial) plus a JX3 wide top platform stick and in my case a 3-step aider.

Pros:
1) Plenty of height. 6ish + 6ish + 5ish = feet at 17-18. I don't see a need to hunt any higher than that.

2) Love climbing with an LB, and not having to sit and raise a tether constantly (1-sticking alternative). Safety concerns acknowledged.

3) Very light, packable and easy to deploy/stow.

4) Looks fast/efficient. I was taking my time due to the first climb, but I could already see how this is very likely going to get quite quick and easy.

Cons:
1) LB combined with feet on webbing raises the pucker factor quite a bit. Straight, easy tree and good technique is key. I used Moab hiking boots and it took me a bit to get good at forcing the ball of my foot into the tree to help pull the Sladder out. It definitely works when you get the hang of it, but it takes some focus.

2) Foot loops seemed a bit small. More fiddle factor than I expected getting boots in and out. I wear size 11 and would like these loops to be a bit bigger. I also found it strange to transition from toes in on the steps to ankles in on they loops, but was pleased with how solid and comfortable it is once in the loops.

3) Daisy chains seem too small. I chose what I consider a standard saddle hunting tree (basketball size). The standard chains did the job, but I was using the tie off method and there wasn't much left to work with to complete the truckers hitch. I got it done, but I can't see why these aren't a foot or so longer. I don't need huge extensions, just material to cover standard hunting. Right out of the bag the first thing I thought was how short the chains looked.

4) Not having a constant lifeline to the ground was a little unnerving. Maybe I've just gotten too used to that with 1-sticking. Maybe it was just being new to the method. I definitely felt like "Man, if something goes wrong I sure wish I had my rappel setup ready to go". Related, I felt like at the top I would just like to rappel down and pack up rather than un-tether and LB down again. Granted, going down was easy peasy, and packing up was simple, but I don't struggle with or dislike packing up rappel gear. I'm not sure that I won't keep that option in combo with this method. However I'd like to carry only one of the two items. Problem is I like climbing up one way better, but the other for coming down. Hmm...

Sent from my SM-S901U using Tapatalk

Where I landed is that #1Con goes away for me because as slow and as careful as I could possibly go, it still only took 5 minutes.

Same for #2Con - see above.

#3Con is annoying. Don't get it. Simple Fix.

#4Con is a Pro for me - I can't make packing rappel gear make sense in a hunting scenario for me as the default. It's just too inefficient. This is so fast, I can't unknow it. (even at a slow careful deliberate pace).



The connection of the sladder to the tree seems to take away some of the inherent instability of other "aider" type devices.


Glad you're giving it a shot. Looking forward to using it again this fall.
 
Back
Top