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Thoughts on a Back Bar

shmelton

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2020
Messages
568
I am consistently shooting my 40yd target 1-2” right. I’m also having to turn my rest to the left to level the sight. I’ve religiously bow hunted for the last 25 yrs, and have never used a back bar. I typically don’t mind having to rotate my wrist left, but due to being stupid in my younger days my shoulders aren’t what they used to be. It’s causing some pain when practicing. Would an 8” back bar on the left side cure the lean?

I’m thinking about using the new Bowtech back bar adapter and an 8” Microhex. I’d start out with 3oz and move up from there. I remove my quiver when shooting/hunting, so all I have on the right side is the sight and quiver base.

I just don’t want to drop $150 on something that’s not going to help. Nor do I want something that’s going to impede a shot during hunting situations.


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I run an older trophy ridge static XS sidebar that helps balance out my quiver weight. They don't show it on their website anymore but apparently walmart still has them. With the adjustability it offers it should be able to offset your lean.

Trophy ridge does have a blitz sidebar on their website that is on sale currently but doesn't have near the adjustability.
 
I had the same issue and adding a back bar helped me. I also found that I really liked it when hunting because i could rest the back bar against my hip and support my bow while waiting for a deer to present a shot opportunity. It stopped my arm from get tired while waiting.
 
I had the same issue and adding a back bar helped me. I also found that I really liked it when hunting because i could rest the back bar against my hip and support my bow while waiting for a deer to present a shot opportunity. It stopped my arm from get tired while waiting.
X2
 
Thanks fellas. I figured it would solve the problem, I just wanted to make sure my thinking was correct.


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I run an older trophy ridge static XS sidebar that helps balance out my quiver weight. They don't show it on their website anymore but apparently walmart still has them. With the adjustability it offers it should be able to offset your lean.

Trophy ridge does have a blitz sidebar on their website that is on sale currently but doesn't have near the adjustability.

I’ve looked at the Stinger side bars, but I’m not sure if I want to go that route.


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The back bar may or may not help. It’s an individual deal. If you need balance it’s a good place to look. Real simple to try different weights and angles. 10” up front and 8” in back is common. I always like 10/6 when I use a back bar. Usually with 3oz up front and 5 in the back.
 
I’ve started using them over the last three years. Depending on the bow, sometimes all you need is the back bar. My target rig has a 10” in the front with 2oz. and 12” with 3 oz in the back. This keeps my top limb from wanting to yaw forward and right. My hunting bow has an 8 up front with 2oz. And a 10 in the back with three.
 
I have a 10” Microhex upfront, with 3oz on it. I ordered another 4oz weight to give me a total of 7 thinking that my new SS34 just needed a little more weight up front just to hold her steadier. It shot tighter groups. I went from shoot a 3” group at 40 to 2” groups. I was still hitting the right side of the bull, however. Having the redneck problem solving skills I have, I took 2 oz off the stabilizer, and added them to the bottom right where the back bar would go. The groups got more centered, but I’m still not hitting where I’m aiming. I don’t like having to rotate my wrist left on the draw. It gets painful, and it can also cause torque that keeps the arrow from flying true.

I may seem picky, but when adrenaline is rushing the last thing I want to be worried about is the sight being level. That is a sure way for me to break my concentration, and screw up. I just want to be able to draw, settle, and fire.

My Evolve was always level when I drew, but I changed some components when I bought my new bow, and it’s just a hair off. Thanks for the replies, I’ll swing by the bow shop soon, and see if they will let me test a back bar out. If they won’t I’ll just buy the dam thing and see where it takes me.


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I've been a diehard bowhunter my whole life.
I just added one to my compound for the first time. No regrets.
 
I had the same issue having to level to the left.
The shop put on a stinger microhex and it helped.

With that said I know a guy that has a pancake weight on his front stabilizer and it rotates to time it to the outboard side as desired and that works too.

You can make a weight for little money if you wish.
 
Is it possible to take the orbital dampener and add weight/extensions to the left side of it to balance your bow? May be a redneck solution available that direction if the back bar isn't your cup of tea
 
Is it possible to take the orbital dampener and add weight/extensions to the left side of it to balance your bow? May be a redneck solution available that direction if the back bar isn't your cup of tea

I pretty much did that already with 2oz of stabilizer weights. I just ran them in the threaded hole at the bottom of the riser. I need more weight though, and I think a stabilizer would suit me better. I don’t mind spending the money, since I only get a new bow every 7 yrs or so. Once it’s set the way I want it, I leave it and don’t fool with anything until it’s worn out.


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Another option could also be an offset qd front stabilizer mount. Usually a back bar will give you the most amount of adjustability, but it all depends on what your goal is.
 
Been using a back bar for 2 years and wish i would have started using one sooner. Like others have said it is really nice to be able to use it to rest the bow while waiting for the deer to get closer or turn. I like being able to grab it off the tree and it sits nice on my saddle without arm fatigue.
 
I went to the bow shop today. The tech tweaked the bow a tad, and added an 8” Microhex with the Bowtech Centermass back bar adapter. I’ve only shot it at the small shop range, but I can tell it’s going to be a game changer. The pins just seem to rest right where they are supposed to instead of bobbing. Dam I wish I’d have done this yrs ago. Again, thanks for the advise!


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