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What’s your camping setups for DIY hunts

g2outdoors

Well-Known Member
Vendor Rep
SH Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2014
Messages
7,427
Location
Savannah, GA
My dream is to just do the truck cap setup that @g2outdoors and many others on YouTube have shown. I just can’t seem to find a deal on a used truck cap that I like.
I love my setup.

There are pros and cons to every camp/tent/truck setup.

I think a truck bed setup like mine is unbeatable for quick 1-3 day hunts.

For longer 5-10 day hunts, I think a tent is better. But it also depends on how much you're moving around. If you have a 10 day hunt, but you expect to change camp sites every few days, I'd give the edge to a truck bed camper.

Either way works.

The flip side is that I absolutely LOVE the camper shell for everyday life. Like many of you guys, I've driven a truck for over 20 years. I've had open beds, and several different tonneau covers on mid-size and full-size trucks. This is my first camper shell and I don't think I'll be going back. Other than cost, there are very few downsides.

I also found a pretty cool pop-up style tent (think pop-up weather proof ground blind) called the gazelle. I'll be using it the next time I go on a longer hunt. I'll do a review on it soon. Been meaning to do that for awhile.

Post pics whenever you decide on something. I'm sure it'll be awesome.

Sent from my IN2019 using Tapatalk
 

TreeCreep

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2020
Messages
258
Im not sure if there is a thread on this- How are you (Northeast) guys selecting out of state campgrounds/ "overnight parking"
spots in relation to your intended hunt area?
Ive only tried "boondocking" in rural PA and just stayed parked after a hunt, pitched a backpacking set up and repeated.
Have a nemo camp shower that made the trip.
 

dlist777

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 21, 2019
Messages
693
I've spent 30 or so nights in this over the last 3 years:

It's a 6 x 10 x 7 foot high trailer. I pulled out the walls and ceiling and put some hard board insulation in it (floor and back door are not insulated).

For Power: I put in a 15a input and wired 3 outlets. I also bought a 100ah deep cycle battery to run lights and a fan when I'm not plugged in. I ran two power stips: one to to the inverter and one to the outlet in the nose. I mounted those and makred one AC and one DC. So, that way I can just move the fan and lights over from DC to AC depending if I'm plugged in. I hooked a charger up to the battery so whenever I'm plugged in (genny or house power) it re-charges. Finally, I added one solar panel to the roof and ran to the battery to help it recharge when not plugged in. This last step was probably overkill. I could just use the genny to recharge the battery and I think that would have worked fine. But, having the solar is nice. I was out 4 days in one stretch and the battery held up fine running fan, lights, and re-charging my phone. I also added a trickle charger for the ATV so when I'm home I just plug the trailer in and the 100ah battery recharges and the ATV is on trickle charge.

For Heat: I ended out mounting two LP tanks on the tongue and using the MR. Buddy heater at night. The MR Buddy worked great. I could raise the temperature 50 degrees even on low in there. This is one of the advantages of having a small space to heat I guess.

For Cooling: Again, I had planned to use my heat/ac unit here. But, I found I didn't need AC. I was only in the trailer during the night and even in September it didn't get THAT hot at night. I bought a shop fan and that can run all night on the battery. That was enough to keep things bearable even during hot evenings.

Shelving I did a redneck special for shelving. I mounted 3 milk crates on a board and then mounted the board into the frame of the trailer. One one side, I use bungees to keep things in place. On the other side, I just mounted wood 1x6's on the front to keep things. I have utensils, bug spray, extension cords, toothbrush, toothpaste, electric bug swatter, etc. etc. in there. It's held up well.

Cooking/Eating: I found a small microwave that runs fine on my honda genny (2k watts). So, when I cook something I just have to run the genny. This is really the only reason I ever have to run the genny. I just bring easily microwaveable stuff in the yeti cooler. I keep some water / bottled drinks on ice in the cooler. I have the genny converted to run on propane.

Bathroom: You can see on the left side of the nose I have small portable toilet. You just put this bag in there (like a double bag) and do your business. It's kind of a zip-loc thing and it easily gets thrown away when you get back home. No mess.

Safety: I have a CO detector and a low O2 detector you'll see on the right up near the nose. I also have a small fire extinguisher mounted on the wall and one in one of those buckets up front.

Shower: Nothing. I just go home when I can't stand my smell anymore.

Organization: I use the etrack system on both walls to hang and secure all my gear. When I put the propane tanks on the tongue, I had to find a place for my spare. So, I mounted that on the wall inside. I also have a table that flips up off the wall. I would say having 7 feet really helped. I think if I had gotten a 6 foot high trailer I would not have been able to cram as much stuff inside. The buckets up front hold jack stands, some bungees, other misc crap. The red bucket is mainly just a trash can.

Sleeping; Just a fold way cot stored on one wall. I have a camping sleeping bag and 2 pillows in the milk crate / shelves.

ATV: ATV is tied down to the floor mounts. I found that so long as I run it dry when i load (keep it running, shut off fuel valve and let it die), the trailer doesn't smell of gas when I get there.

Here are a bunch of pics loaded, unloaded, set up to sleep etc.
 

Attachments

Fl Canopy Stalker

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2021
Messages
246
So I just broke out my $40 tent from Walmart and got to wondering what other tent options are out there. What’s some of your guys setups and tips for camping? I normally will have 2 people when I hunt so space for me the more the better. Pictures would be nice to look at too. Also any tips for keeping a tent warm during those cold miserable days.
We used to draw out the big tents and sleeping bags and air mattresses until 2 years ago.... Nowadays I set up a hammock with an under quilt. Hang a small rain fly tarp close over top and a small camp pillow. My whole set up fits in my hunting pack and I pack a small cooler with drinks and lunchables. (Don’t tell my kids I took their lunchables) It gets a little colder than tent camping but the difference isn’t much and it’s a lot less to drag out... I guess my camping style has become “ultra-lite” like saddle set ups
 

Fl Canopy Stalker

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2021
Messages
246
I've spent 30 or so nights in this over the last 3 years:

It's a 6 x 10 x 7 foot high trailer. I pulled out the walls and ceiling and put some hard board insulation in it (floor and back door are not insulated).

For Power: I put in a 15a input and wired 3 outlets. I also bought a 100ah deep cycle battery to run lights and a fan when I'm not plugged in. I ran two power stips: one to to the inverter and one to the outlet in the nose. I mounted those and makred one AC and one DC. So, that way I can just move the fan and lights over from DC to AC depending if I'm plugged in. I hooked a charger up to the battery so whenever I'm plugged in (genny or house power) it re-charges. Finally, I added one solar panel to the roof and ran to the battery to help it recharge when not plugged in. This last step was probably overkill. I could just use the genny to recharge the battery and I think that would have worked fine. But, having the solar is nice. I was out 4 days in one stretch and the battery held up fine running fan, lights, and re-charging my phone. I also added a trickle charger for the ATV so when I'm home I just plug the trailer in and the 100ah battery recharges and the ATV is on trickle charge.

For Heat: I ended out mounting two LP tanks on the tongue and using the MR. Buddy heater at night. The MR Buddy worked great. I could raise the temperature 50 degrees even on low in there. This is one of the advantages of having a small space to heat I guess.

For Cooling: Again, I had planned to use my heat/ac unit here. But, I found I didn't need AC. I was only in the trailer during the night and even in September it didn't get THAT hot at night. I bought a shop fan and that can run all night on the battery. That was enough to keep things bearable even during hot evenings.

Shelving I did a redneck special for shelving. I mounted 3 milk crates on a board and then mounted the board into the frame of the trailer. One one side, I use bungees to keep things in place. On the other side, I just mounted wood 1x6's on the front to keep things. I have utensils, bug spray, extension cords, toothbrush, toothpaste, electric bug swatter, etc. etc. in there. It's held up well.

Cooking/Eating: I found a small microwave that runs fine on my honda genny (2k watts). So, when I cook something I just have to run the genny. This is really the only reason I ever have to run the genny. I just bring easily microwaveable stuff in the yeti cooler. I keep some water / bottled drinks on ice in the cooler. I have the genny converted to run on propane.

Bathroom: You can see on the left side of the nose I have small portable toilet. You just put this bag in there (like a double bag) and do your business. It's kind of a zip-loc thing and it easily gets thrown away when you get back home. No mess.

Safety: I have a CO detector and a low O2 detector you'll see on the right up near the nose. I also have a small fire extinguisher mounted on the wall and one in one of those buckets up front.

Shower: Nothing. I just go home when I can't stand my smell anymore.

Organization: I use the etrack system on both walls to hang and secure all my gear. When I put the propane tanks on the tongue, I had to find a place for my spare. So, I mounted that on the wall inside. I also have a table that flips up off the wall. I would say having 7 feet really helped. I think if I had gotten a 6 foot high trailer I would not have been able to cram as much stuff inside. The buckets up front hold jack stands, some bungees, other misc crap. The red bucket is mainly just a trash can.

Sleeping; Just a fold way cot stored on one wall. I have a camping sleeping bag and 2 pillows in the milk crate / shelves.

ATV: ATV is tied down to the floor mounts. I found that so long as I run it dry when i load (keep it running, shut off fuel valve and let it die), the trailer doesn't smell of gas when I get there.

Here are a bunch of pics loaded, unloaded, set up to sleep etc.
You’re glamping in style lol
 

Jtaylor

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2018
Messages
1,222
I have my camper rigged to run on 12v. I have a plug in if I want to plug into shore power and it will power my battery charger and an electric heater. Same plug can plug into a genny. Everything in my cargo trailer runs on 12v. So if I have no power, 2 12v batteries this year never drained down for 2 weeks powering only led lights & water pump. I crack a window and use a buddy heater connected to a propane tank outside. That same propane port heats my on demand water heater. Alway crack a window if you are using a gas heater. And install a CO alarm. I installed a bathroom sink, toilet and shower, 60gal water holding tank, full size bunk beds, exhaust fan in the bathroom and a super exhaust fan in the general area that will suck air through the open windows and feel like AC at night, but the fans draw a lot of watts and I don’t use them unless I can charge my batteries.
Some pics are older. I’ve been updating through the years.
This is cool as is, there's still plenty of space to use it as a trailer too. Are there any clearance issues when going over dips with the holding tank for the crapper, sink and shower? I've noticed a lot of the utility trailers are pretty low to the ground but I guess a guy could flip the leaf springs or go with bigger wheels/tires.
 

swampsnyper

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2015
Messages
4,351
Location
Warrior, Al
This is cool as is, there's still plenty of space to use it as a trailer too. Are there any clearance issues when going over dips with the holding tank for the crapper, sink and shower? I've noticed a lot of the utility trailers are pretty low to the ground but I guess a guy could flip the leaf springs or go with bigger wheels/tires.
No holding tanks attached. I have a portable holding tank on wheels. It is very low. I had to make a ramp to drive the trailer up on so I could gravity flow to waste tank.

Oh, and I welded heavy square tubing runners as a skid under the trailer because I used it as a stationary camp at my old lease which I had to cross a ditch with it to get to the camp spot. I think I would have distroyed an rv. I just drug the cargo trailer through on the skids.
 
Last edited:

Patriot

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2019
Messages
643
I love my setup.

There are pros and cons to every camp/tent/truck setup.

I think a truck bed setup like mine is unbeatable for quick 1-3 day hunts.

For longer 5-10 day hunts, I think a tent is better. But it also depends on how much you're moving around. If you have a 10 day hunt, but you expect to change camp sites every few days, I'd give the edge to a truck bed camper.

Either way works.

The flip side is that I absolutely LOVE the camper shell for everyday life. Like many of you guys, I've driven a truck for over 20 years. I've had open beds, and several different tonneau covers on mid-size and full-size trucks. This is my first camper shell and I don't think I'll be going back. Other than cost, there are very few downsides.

I also found a pretty cool pop-up style tent (think pop-up weather proof ground blind) called the gazelle. I'll be using it the next time I go on a longer hunt. I'll do a review on it soon. Been meaning to do that for awhile.

Post pics whenever you decide on something. I'm sure it'll be awesome.

Sent from my IN2019 using Tapatalk
thanks man, I was going to ask a bunch of those questions too.
 

Patriot

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2019
Messages
643
I love my setup.

There are pros and cons to every camp/tent/truck setup.

I think a truck bed setup like mine is unbeatable for quick 1-3 day hunts.

For longer 5-10 day hunts, I think a tent is better. But it also depends on how much you're moving around. If you have a 10 day hunt, but you expect to change camp sites every few days, I'd give the edge to a truck bed camper.

Either way works.

The flip side is that I absolutely LOVE the camper shell for everyday life. Like many of you guys, I've driven a truck for over 20 years. I've had open beds, and several different tonneau covers on mid-size and full-size trucks. This is my first camper shell and I don't think I'll be going back. Other than cost, there are very few downsides.

I also found a pretty cool pop-up style tent (think pop-up weather proof ground blind) called the gazelle. I'll be using it the next time I go on a longer hunt. I'll do a review on it soon. Been meaning to do that for awhile.

Post pics whenever you decide on something. I'm sure it'll be awesome.

Sent from my IN2019 using Tapatalk
Greg what about temp controls? Are you just using windows and fans to stay cool or have you found that you need heaters and other stuff to stay comfortable?
 

g2outdoors

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Vendor Rep
SH Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2014
Messages
7,427
Location
Savannah, GA
The coldest night I've had so far was in the low 30s. I didn't need a heater. Just a good sleeping bag. That was also with the windows vented. It's surprising how warm your body heat can keep a truck bed camper.

I have a fan in there too, but I don't think I'd want to sleep in the truck bed above 60 degrees at night. I think it would get pretty hot.

Great pics @dlist777

Sent from my IN2019 using Tapatalk
 

boyne bowhunter

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SH Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2016
Messages
4,739
Location
Michigan
I typically spend between 35 and 40 days hunting remote from home every year including most of the month of November. For 15 years or so this was home away from home. I've had night time encounters with porcupines, racoons, and even a couple bears camping in this thing. The coldest I night I remember was -15F. It froze every drop of water in the camper solid including my 5 gallon jerry can and my contacts in their saline. It has a heater but I never burned it at night, I stayed plenty comfortable just using a real good sleeping bag. I will say I learned to put the contacts into the sleeping bag with me after that. :tearsofjoy:

1613605541054.png

The last couple of years I've gotten soft . . . this is the home away from home now. It may sound funny but the thing I miss the most about the popup is the sound of the coyotes howling at night. I just don't hear them in the hard side like I did in the popup. Two years ago though we had a two foot fall of snow on top of the foot that was already there the night before I was planning on breaking camp. I wasn't sure the camper wasn't going to end up staying in the woods for the winter. It took two daisy chained pickups and about 3 hours of alternating pulling and shoveling to turn it back toward the direction it had to go.

1613605786694.png
 
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