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Wild edge stepp lovers

redsquirrel

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I started using wild edge stepps in 2017 in some form or another. I've tinkered with some other stuff in the meantime but nothing has replaced them. Since the knaider came out I've used them with a knaider. 7 stepps and a knaider and I'm up at least 20 feet. I don't think there is a much safer method because I always have something up above me to help pull myself up. Once you get comfortable with putting them on they go on really easy. Once in a while they may shift a little bit but they're never coming off. I think they are the best compromise between safe, packable and weight. I've tried a lot of sticks and sticks really don't compare in the packable department. I can go up the tree fast if I want, but more importantly I can sneak up the tree quietly without a ton of movement with them.

So share your love of stepps here. Whether you use the wild edge aider, knaider or just use them as they are. ( I don't support the knaider/swaider combo fyi!!!)
 

tylerray378

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Jul 6, 2018
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261
Location
Chillicothe, OH
I used 4 primals back when the plywood platform was getting popular. I never got comfortable with the knot and sold them. I ended up running hawk sticks with a CAYG aider and it worked. 1 sticked the last two years. This year I got more primals and swapped them to amsteel. Just got a genesis 3D gripr and have a knaider coming in the mail today. Can’t wait to try them again. Compactness is hard to beat like you said. If I enjoy them I plan to add a WE perch.
 

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gcr0003

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Nov 1, 2018
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5,678
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North Alabama
I started using wild edge stepps in 2017 in some form or another. I've tinkered with some other stuff in the meantime but nothing has replaced them. Since the knaider came out I've used them with a knaider. 7 stepps and a knaider and I'm up at least 20 feet. I don't think there is a much safer method because I always have something up above me to help pull myself up. Once you get comfortable with putting them on they go on really easy. Once in a while they may shift a little bit but they're never coming off. I think they are the best compromise between safe, packable and weight. I've tried a lot of sticks and sticks really don't compare in the packable department. I can go up the tree fast if I want, but more importantly I can sneak up the tree quietly without a ton of movement with them.

So share your love of stepps here. Whether you use the wild edge aider, knaider or just use them as they are. ( I don't support the knaider/swaider combo fyi!!!)
I saw you were interested in those webbing ladder steps that just came out (I can’t remember the name). Have you ever considered using a four or five step webbing ladder to attach to your wild edge steps? I think you would only need three or four wild edge steps to get to hunting height. This seems to be the same concept as those new webbing ladders but you would be using the WE step as the attachment point instead of webbing footloops. If that makes any sense.
 

redsquirrel

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Feb 19, 2014
Messages
14,399
Location
NJ
I used 4 primals back when the plywood platform was getting popular. I never got comfortable with the knot and sold them. I ended up running hawk sticks with a CAYG aider and it worked. 1 sticked the last two years. This year I got more primals and swapped them to amsteel. Just got a genesis 3D gripr and have a knaider coming in the mail today. Can’t wait to try them again. Compactness is hard to beat like you said. If I enjoy them I plan to add a WE perch.
Just keep at it. There is a learning curve but once you master them it is worth it.
 

Jtaylor

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Dec 25, 2018
Messages
1,789
I saw you were interested in those webbing ladder steps that just came out (I can’t remember the name). Have you ever considered using a four or five step webbing ladder to attach to your wild edge steps? I think you would only need three or four wild edge steps to get to hunting height. This seems to be the same concept as those new webbing ladders but you would be using the WE step as the attachment point instead of webbing footloops. If that makes any sense.
I've done this with a black diamond etrier using an amsteel loop on the crossbar (so it minimizes slide) and it works fine going up but is a bit of a pain unhooking the etrier and a little more difficult going back down. That being said, it's definitely doable and not all that difficult.
If I had two dedicated etriers and didn't unhook them it would be very doable if a guy is comfortable with etrier/aider climbing.
 

redsquirrel

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Feb 19, 2014
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14,399
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NJ
I saw you were interested in those webbing ladder steps that just came out (I can’t remember the name). Have you ever considered using a four or five step webbing ladder to attach to your wild edge steps? I think you would only need three or four wild edge steps to get to hunting height. This seems to be the same concept as those new webbing ladders but you would be using the WE step as the attachment point instead of webbing footloops. If that makes any sense.
Yes, I tinkered with that briefly a few years ago. It didn't make the cut for me at that time just because I try to keep things simple and stupid safe. I have tried most methods in my backyard and can do them but the next step is evaluating the use of them over a mile back in the woods alone. Often the risk reward isn't there for me. I used spurs for a bit but one day I stepped on my boot and put a hole in it when I was 1.5 miles back. That could have easily been my foot and become a bad situation quick so they're no longer in my arsenal.
 

gcr0003

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Nov 1, 2018
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North Alabama
I've done this with a black diamond etrier using an amsteel loop on the crossbar (so it minimizes slide) and it works fine going up but is a bit of a pain unhooking the etrier and a little more difficult going back down. That being said, it's definitely doable and not all that difficult.
If I had two dedicated etriers and didn't unhook them it would be very doable if a guy is comfortable with etrier/aider climbing.
I figured someone had to have tried it before. I think the benefit of two point connection ladder vs the one point l etrier would be that it would be more stable since the two connection stiffen it up some more. I use a three 3 step ladder on my one stick so that’s what I’m imagining but with one more step on it. It is super stable and I can practically run up it. A rappel down would be a nice touch to this system.
 

gcr0003

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Nov 1, 2018
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North Alabama
Yes, I tinkered with that briefly a few years ago. It didn't make the cut for me at that time just because I try to keep things simple and stupid safe. I have tried most methods in my backyard and can do them but the next step is evaluating the use of them over a mile back in the woods alone. Often the risk reward isn't there for me. I used spurs for a bit but one day I stepped on my boot and put a hole in it when I was 1.5 miles back. That could have easily been my foot and become a bad situation quick so they're no longer in my arsenal.
Yea it’s the constant battle of just because I can climb this way, should I?
 

Hall17

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Jan 27, 2021
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1,378
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Pennsylvania
I've done this with a black diamond etrier using an amsteel loop on the crossbar (so it minimizes slide) and it works fine going up but is a bit of a pain unhooking the etrier and a little more difficult going back down. That being said, it's definitely doable and not all that difficult.
If I had two dedicated etriers and didn't unhook them it would be very doable if a guy is comfortable with etrier/aider climbing.
Brave! Not sure I would try coming down with the aider myself. I tried the Amsteel loops myself and had the same experience. I took them off and used hockey tape to create two knobs/bookends so to speak so it doesn’t slide
 

redsquirrel

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Feb 19, 2014
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NJ
I saw you were interested in those webbing ladder steps that just came out (I can’t remember the name). Have you ever considered using a four or five step webbing ladder to attach to your wild edge steps? I think you would only need three or four wild edge steps to get to hunting height. This seems to be the same concept as those new webbing ladders but you would be using the WE step as the attachment point instead of webbing footloops. If that makes any sense.
Also, I've been considering adding one to just my bottom stepp so I'm just doing that for the first step off the ground but I'm not sure if it is worth it or not. I haven't had much time this year to tinker with hunting stuff since we had the new baby so I've just been rolling with my tried and true. My hunting bin for the truck literally went in the garage last february and came back into the truck without being opened 2 days before the season this year lol.
 

KYHunter

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Jan 20, 2018
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I used them(Primal) and a wooden platform for a couple seasons and loved them! I’ve since moved on but I still have them and my sitdrag as a backup. I used 6 with the Cain method and found them very easy and quiet to use.
I also liked how compact they are. I could strap them to the wooden platform And then roll up my sitdrag and wedge it between the stand-off. A simple and good system.
 

skell

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Oct 25, 2016
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Iowa
I'm a fan of the WE stepps. It took me a while to be sold on them. But my initial approach was use them for a full season and then decide. Well, 4 years later they are still my go to. I also like the knaider. That combo has been great IMO. Not quite as fast as some other methods (for me), but I do a better job of moving slower and being quiet. I've historically been good at being quiet getting in and then making noise while climbing. Stepps have definitely helped me in that area.
 

Jtaylor

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Brave! Not sure I would try coming down with the aider myself. I tried the Amsteel loops myself and had the same experience. I took them off and used hockey tape to create two knobs/bookends so to speak so it doesn’t slide
I made my loops into a prusik and used a castration band to hold it tight, it doesn't slide.
 

redsquirrel

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I saw you were interested in those webbing ladder steps that just came out (I can’t remember the name). Have you ever considered using a four or five step webbing ladder to attach to your wild edge steps? I think you would only need three or four wild edge steps to get to hunting height. This seems to be the same concept as those new webbing ladders but you would be using the WE step as the attachment point instead of webbing footloops. If that makes any sense.
Another thing is that a pack of stepps in the MR popup packs so well and carries so easy that it's not really necessary to try to shave a pound or 2 there because it's not very noticeable.

The one area I'm constantly trying to improve on is the bag. They carry really well in the bag but it's tight. I actually flip them upside down from how it is designed, put my ROS, bow and pack holder on the bottom, then pull up rope and knaider on the top. Last year there was a thread on this bag and I've been using it since I got it but eventually I'm going to make my own bag. This bag is nice and has a couple pockets to hold my smaller stuff but it is a little wider and bulkier so it doesn't pack quite as streamlined.
 

gcr0003

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Nov 1, 2018
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North Alabama
Also, I've been considering adding one to just my bottom stepp so I'm just doing that for the first step off the ground but I'm not sure if it is worth it or not. I haven't had much time this year to tinker with hunting stuff since we had the new baby so I've just been rolling with my tried and true. My hunting bin for the truck literally went in the garage last february and came back into the truck without being opened 2 days before the season this year lol.
From my 2 season of one sticking experience with a 3 foot Aider I would say it is worth it. I can easily set the stick 7-8’ and get up there with just a lineman’s belt quickly.

 

kyler1945

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Dec 4, 2016
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Willis, TX

Maybe revisiting this spurs an idea on the bag
 

gcr0003

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Nov 1, 2018
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North Alabama
I found some wild edge steps in the woods and they were just loosely tied with over hand knots… whoever was using them was not even camming them over. It appeared they just let them slide down the tree until they were tight. Talk about sketchy.
 

KYHunter

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Jan 20, 2018
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I never used a bag with mine. When it came time to climb I would attach them to my saddle. I had 3 “straps” that would each hold two of the steps with the V portion facing down. Gravity and tightness to my body held them in. As I climbed it was just a matter of reaching behind me and grabbing the next one
 
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