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EZV TIPS PLEASE?

_Dario

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Feb 26, 2021
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Aside from the 3D target tip. Once you think you found your insert, go and shoot 30 yard groups with the next highest and lowest insert. Do this on separate days too. You will really dial in your insert. Once your 20 yard is set don’t be afraid to swap out inserts because they are the same on all inserts.


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Weldabeast

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The main benefit for me personally is the open sight picture....with a pin sight at 25-30yds the pin is covering the spot I'm aiming and I get anxiety....I think that's what target panic is? To me it's also much more natural feeling to leave both my eyes open looking at my aim point and bring the v up until the gaps right vs shooting 1 eye closed
 

BuffaloBill

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Jan 20, 2019
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Indiana
The main benefit for me personally is the open sight picture....with a pin sight at 25-30yds the pin is covering the spot I'm aiming and I get anxiety....I think that's what target panic is? To me it's also much more natural feeling to leave both my eyes open looking at my aim point and bring the v up until the gaps right vs shooting 1 eye closed
Agreed. I'm not Levi Morgan. Here in the Midwest I'm not shooting past 30ish yards in the woods. I like watching my arrow impact the target.
 

Red Beard

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@NATHAN My tip is this... get yourself a good, life-size 3D target and only shoot that from here on out. Don't shoot a bag or a block anymore. You bought the EZV to effectively range and kill deer, so only shoot deer sized targets with it. Your brain will catch on faster and you won't be confused/discouraged because you can't "visualize a basketball" on the target in the heat of the moment.

For what it's worth, I think the most realistic 3D target for whitetail in VA is the BIGshot Pro Hunter target. In my opinion, there is a huge difference in a target like this and a Field Logic Big Shooter Buck. Your EZV will remind you of that immediately if you loose an arrow in the woods on a nanny at 32yds when you've practiced all summer on a 2/3 scale target.
 

Mopar1169

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Feb 26, 2020
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I like it, I went out sent a few arrows through the new bow. It is not the tightest group in the world. 20 yards 5 arrows. But it has been 22 years since I have touched a compound. This is only my 3rd time shooting my new bow and I don't have a anchor on the string yet just d loop. Anyways I think the ezv is pretty slick. Gonna like this thing, I was surprised it is so dang close to being on target too for just slapping it on. Screenshot_20210716-202433.pngScreenshot_20210716-202421.png
 

dalton916

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Do you think there’s a lot of hunters who can stack arrows with a well tuned bow and arrow and shooting form leave for the woods with their stack of arrows hitting 12” from the bullseye?

I bet there’s a lot more that think spraying arrows in a 12 circle from 20 yards is good enough to go hunt.

I know which group of hunters I’m putting my money on.

for the record, I don’t find an issue with either. But to say that precision is trumped by accuracy leaves out a lot of important details. The most important of which is the amount of randomness in a dynamic situation like hunting. There’s hundreds of inputs you can’t control in the few seconds it takes to draw and shoot at an animal. The more variables you can control, the more arrows will find their mark.

consistency.
No, I don’t, you’re missing the point. The point is just as I stated in my original post, there’s a difference between precision and accuracy and I pointed that out.

You cannot have precision without a capable weapon AND a capable shooter. Yes, that person, when they discover whatever it takes to have that precision, will then dial it in to the target. You know that makes it? Precise AND accurate.

So, yes, accuracy trumps precision and always will because you can miss precisely, you can NOT miss accurately.
 

kyler1945

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Baton Rouge, La.
This is a perfect analogy. I deal with firearms and always remind people the AR-15 is not a precision rifle. It is a “hit a humanoid torso” effectively and accurately rifle.

So to combine this statement and @_Dario comment on time splits is exactly why I run the site and love it.

It is fast and accurate, but not slow and precise.

I also feel that if @kyler1945 has that many reps on the EZV you should do some form of study or comparison on the deterioration of accuracy versus a pin over X amount of time and what that erosion potentially equates to.

For example: Like an IDPA or USPSA shooting competition. Get a shot timer and a target at 10/20/30/40/50/60 yards and time yourself shooting with the EZV. Then record hits like a 3D match. Repeat with pin then compare times and scores. I went through this process when the RMR became an option on Glock pistols. People were wondering if it was worth it versus iron sights. In the end it was so close it came down to whatever each individual wanted to run but there was no leaps and bounds clear cut winner. I’m just brainstorming. Something like that though maybe. I do not have that many reps on mine but I’m getting there. Do you work at a shop or are you a pro outdoorsman or guide? Congratulations on doing that. That’s bad azz.

None of the above. I've just shot a bow my entire life, a lot, and I wanted to like the product. Aaron is a standup dude. I love the concept. But unfortunately, in spending a bunch of time with it, I discovered that at best, it doesn't make a material difference for the ranges I would shoot a deer at, and at worst, can create a crisis of instinct for me(and probably other shooters too).

You can read my thread on shooting the EZV, and see how excited I was. You can also sniff my reservations if you're reading closely. Bottom line, I missed a hammer on what should've been a chip shot. Opportunities like that don't come along often on public dirt in south Louisiana. If I had my standard ole single pin set up (you can also read my preaching on that setup for whitetail hunting), he's dead. I'm not blaming the sight. But it's gotten quite a cult following round here.

I'm happy to expand the conversation elsewhere out of respect for the OP. But I don't feel bad trying to temper folks' expectations about the sight. It does have some advantages, I won't deny that.
 

Zero One Actual

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Dec 8, 2020
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South Eastern United States
@NATHAN My tip is this... get yourself a good, life-size 3D target and only shoot that from here on out. Don't shoot a bag or a block anymore. You bought the EZV to effectively range and kill deer, so only shoot deer sized targets with it. Your brain will catch on faster and you won't be confused/discouraged because you can't "visualize a basketball" on the target in the heat of the moment.

For what it's worth, I think the most realistic 3D target for whitetail in VA is the BIGshot Pro Hunter target. In my opinion, there is a huge difference in a target like this and a Field Logic Big Shooter Buck. Your EZV will remind you of that immediately if you loose an arrow in the woods on a nanny at 32yds when you've practiced all summer on a 2/3 scale target.
This! I only shoot my Delta McKenzie Bloodline 3D target and I will set it up at different angles and distances. My kid loves moving the deer for me while I’m up in the saddle. He will put it wherever he wants trying to make me miss. It’s the old “keep em closed dad, not yet” game. It’s actually very helpful.
 

_Dario

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Pennsylvania
[mention]kyler1945 [/mention] out of curiosity, do you remember how much practice you put in with the sight prior to this missed opportunity? Was it practice with a 3D target, from a stand, at different ranges, etc? (what I’ll refer to as quality practice)

Remaining on thread topic, is there something you’d recommend as far as quality practice goes that you think EZV users should be doing? Or is your advice not to use the sight at all?


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dalton916

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None of the above. I've just shot a bow my entire life, a lot, and I wanted to like the product. Aaron is a standup dude. I love the concept. But unfortunately, in spending a bunch of time with it, I discovered that at best, it doesn't make a material difference for the ranges I would shoot a deer at, and at worst, can create a crisis of instinct for me(and probably other shooters too).

You can read my thread on shooting the EZV, and see how excited I was. You can also sniff my reservations if you're reading closely. Bottom line, I missed a hammer on what should've been a chip shot. Opportunities like that don't come along often on public dirt in south Louisiana. If I had my standard ole single pin set up (you can also read my preaching on that setup for whitetail hunting), he's dead. I'm not blaming the sight. But it's gotten quite a cult following round here.

I'm happy to expand the conversation elsewhere out of respect for the OP. But I don't feel bad trying to temper folks' expectations about the sight. It does have some advantages, I won't deny that.
Out of curiosity (mine) how many deer did you shoot at with the sight before you gave up on it?
 

Zero One Actual

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Interesting.

For novice shooters, do you think irons benefit those with bad form, forcing them to aim?

Whereas more refined shooters may be even faster with dot sights, which aim more simply. Seems thats what the comp guys run. IDK, I don't really follow that stuff. Probably proficient iron sight shooters won't loose much given their developed proficiency.

Familiarity with oneself and one's optic is always important, no matter the optics choice.

.....................

Seems that the main benefit of the EZV is range compensation...I know the heavy arrow craze is So'popular but the counter argument is....it requires range compensation.

I'll give up some mac truck factor to hit where I aim easier; why I don't run an EZV, or sling heavyweights.
1. The United States Marine Corps stopped teaching iron sight shooting in boot camp for a reason. So if their shooting instructors and program managers said that’s okay then that in itself says something about new shooters and iron sights versus reticle a and magnified optics.
2. Teaching a new shooter on a red dot is much faster than teaching an iron sight shooter to re learn a red dot (aka a pin shooter going to the EZV). I see most people take between 500-1000 rounds to get back to speed with a red dot mounted on a pistol after transitioning from iron sights. Just like a pin, your brain and eyes are used to the years of reps and sight pictures that you are now telling it to unlearn and reprogram to a new system. Just like a firearm, a bow sight is being used in a self induced stressful situation and until you get to X amount of reps to where you feel comfortable and relaxed in said stressful situation you will always have issues. Target panic. Anticipation. Etc.

Does anyone know of someone who began archery on an EZV instead of a pin? We need to find that person and ask them how intuitive it was once explained properly by an instructor or EZV veteran.
 

dalton916

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The reason I ask is along the lines of my first post on this thread. You may well have to “relearn” the shooting at deer part.

I got the sight because my 55 (at the time) year old eyes couldn’t lock in on pins anymore. It was a breeze to set up and get dialed in (accurate).

I shot it a ton and was very satisfied. I would set up 3D targets in random places around the yard just walk around and shoot. Uphill, downhill, random angles and of course random distances. I just kept pouring arrows into the boiler room.

Then I took it hunting…..missed two deer about 10 minutes apart. One uphill at 22 yds (shot under) and one downhill at 30 yds (shot over)

Replaying both shots in my mind after the fact (and a lot of bitching and swearing off compound bows altogether) I definitively remember looking for the tick marks. That’s something I NEVER did in the yard….I gave it to a friend of mine who’s having issues focusing on pins nowadays himself and I gave him the same advice I give anyone: you have to learn to trust your brain and leave it alone and let it work when you first start shooting it and, for some, you’ll have to make a conscious effort to trust your brain when switch to shooting at the real deal as well.
 

dalton916

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1. The United States Marine Corps stopped teaching iron sight shooting in boot camp for a reason. So if their shooting instructors and program managers said that’s okay then that in itself says something about new shooters and iron sights versus reticle a and magnified optics.
2. Teaching a new shooter on a red dot is much faster than teaching an iron sight shooter to re learn a red dot (aka a pin shooter going to the EZV). I see most people take between 500-1000 rounds to get back to speed with a red dot mounted on a pistol after transitioning from iron sights. Just like a pin, your brain and eyes are used to the years of reps and sight pictures that you are now telling it to unlearn and reprogram to a new system. Just like a firearm, a bow sight is being used in a self induced stressful situation and until you get to X amount of reps to where you feel comfortable and relaxed in said stressful situation you will always have issues. Target panic. Anticipation. Etc.

Does anyone know of someone who began archery on an EZV instead of a pin? We need to find that person and ask them how intuitive it was once explained properly by an instructor or EZV veteran.
See!!!
 

tcmetrohunter

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Oct 12, 2019
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1. The United States Marine Corps stopped teaching iron sight shooting in boot camp for a reason. So if their shooting instructors and program managers said that’s okay then that in itself says something about new shooters and iron sights versus reticle a and magnified optics.
2. Teaching a new shooter on a red dot is much faster than teaching an iron sight shooter to re learn a red dot (aka a pin shooter going to the EZV). I see most people take between 500-1000 rounds to get back to speed with a red dot mounted on a pistol after transitioning from iron sights. Just like a pin, your brain and eyes are used to the years of reps and sight pictures that you are now telling it to unlearn and reprogram to a new system. Just like a firearm, a bow sight is being used in a self induced stressful situation and until you get to X amount of reps to where you feel comfortable and relaxed in said stressful situation you will always have issues. Target panic. Anticipation. Etc.

Does anyone know of someone who began archery on an EZV instead of a pin? We need to find that person and ask them how intuitive it was once explained properly by an instructor or EZV veteran.
This is why I think I like the ezv. I'm one of the older fellas that learned with the iron sights and it just leaves me nice and calm when holding on target. I see everything and bracket accordingly them let the arrow go. When I had the pins I was trying to aim small and miss small and I was constantly holding and trying to adjust to the exact point I wanted to hit which induced fatigue and I would pull shots.

If that makes sense

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Plebe

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Sep 14, 2020
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1. The United States Marine Corps stopped teaching iron sight shooting in boot camp for a reason. So if their shooting instructors and program managers said that’s okay then that in itself says something about new shooters and iron sights versus reticle a and magnified optics.
2. Teaching a new shooter on a red dot is much faster than teaching an iron sight shooter to re learn a red dot (aka a pin shooter going to the EZV). I see most people take between 500-1000 rounds to get back to speed with a red dot mounted on a pistol after transitioning from iron sights. Just like a pin, your brain and eyes are used to the years of reps and sight pictures that you are now telling it to unlearn and reprogram to a new system. Just like a firearm, a bow sight is being used in a self induced stressful situation and until you get to X amount of reps to where you feel comfortable and relaxed in said stressful situation you will always have issues. Target panic. Anticipation. Etc.

Does anyone know of someone who began archery on an EZV instead of a pin? We need to find that person and ask them how intuitive it was once explained properly by an instructor or EZV veteran.
What's the effective range that boots are trained for proficiency?

Does the new approach say more about the shooters or the leadership?

Idk, I like your last paragraph though. Reiterating, Familiarity with oneself and one's optic is always important, no matter the optics choice.
 

tcmetrohunter

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What's the effective range that boots are trained for proficiency?

Does the new approach say more about the shooters or the leadership?

Idk, I like your last paragraph though. Reiterating, Familiarity with oneself and one's optic is always important, no matter the optics choice.
The known distance range they learn to shoot at 200, 300, and 500 yards. While it baffled me that they switched from shooting with irons in boot camp to the RCO it made sense after I thought about it more. My understanding was that since we were no longer using iron sights in both the theatre and in garrison it was pointless to teach them iron sights only to have them have to learn a whole new optic in like a year. Or worse they are infantrymen and they leave boot camp to go to ITB and they have to start over learning an optic they could have taught in boot. Hell I didn't even have back up irons in my day when I had an RCO.

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Topdog

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You guys that like iron sights, google search the Eradicator bow sight, I had one years ago pimped out with tritium like my glock, it wasn’t for me really and I never hunted with it, at the time I wanted a no peep sight and was having vision issues. It’s basically iron sights for a bow.
 

tcmetrohunter

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They also shoot a little on an unknown distance range and that's where the RCO shines because it has a reticle similar in design to an EZV.

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Plebe

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The known distance range they learn to shoot at 200, 300, and 500 yards. While it baffled me that they switched from shooting with irons in boot camp to the RCO it made sense after I thought about it more. My understanding was that since we were no longer using iron sights in both the theatre and in garrison it was pointless to teach them iron sights only to have them have to learn a whole new optic in like a year. Or worse they are infantrymen and they leave boot camp to go to ITB and they have to start over learning an optic they could have taught in boot. Hell I didn't even have back up irons in my day when I had an RCO.

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Would you have preferred backup irons? :)

RCO, not red dot. OK. So, add a bdc factor.

P&Y are typically taken at less than 30yds. Arrow drop compensation, it's for Ranch Fairies.

Stretch the range out, forget the boot, what does that shooter's reticle look like?
 
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