• The SH Membership has gone live. Only SH Members have access to post in the classifieds. All members can view the classifieds. Starting in 2020 only SH Members will be admitted to the annual hunting contest. Current members will need to follow these steps to upgrade: 1. Click on your username 2. Click on Account upgrades 3. Choose SH Member and purchase.
  • We've been working hard the past few weeks to come up with some big changes to our vendor policies to meet the changing needs of our community. Please see the new vendor rules here: Vendor Access Area Rules

Hot meal while in the Saddle

Spartan

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2021
Messages
385
Once you start cooking, you have transitioned from hunting to camping. You're just choosing to camp 20ft up in a tree for some reason. But I'm sure that any other hunters in the woods will thank you for pushing the deer their way :wink:
 

dhoff545

Member
SH Member
Joined
Dec 23, 2019
Messages
50
Location
Green Bay, WI
I concur with the general consensus that cooking while up the tree is dicey. I have however done it. wedged a knock off jet boil in a crotch and fired 'er up. Once I heard it boiling I poured the water into my mountain house, tossed that back into my pack, waited for the burner to cool packed that up and started eating. Was simpler than rope climbing down and back up just to eat.

I in general don't do all day sits and I typically cook while moving between morning and evening stands. There is no way I would carry a separate shelf to cook on elevated. I would consider dropping down and cooking on my ambush, but I've been using stirrups lately so that's not really an option.

The addition of a lightweight cook kit and a good back pack really helps with hunting deeper. One of the main reasons I'm saddle hunting is the weight addition is minimal compared to the functionality. I plan on doing some overnights this coming year, will be way easier than packing back in there two mornings in a row.
 

Jammintree

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2021
Messages
562
Between safety and effective hunting strategy I don’t see the point in cooking with open flame while tethered at height. But I guess it’s all about what makes you happy and why you’re truly out there.
 

2Sloe

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2021
Messages
907
Location
Virginia Beach VA
2 Power Bars, a couple of string cheeses and a 20oz thermos of coffee is about all the weight I‘m willing to add, but if I wanted a hot meal my vote would be for a thermos full of something. Too many negatives and fiddle factor with cooking in the tree for me. But if it increases the enjoyment for you, then by all means that is what you should do. I think a piece of paracord cinched 2/3 up the Jet Boil cup and clipped your hys strap so it would hang about 12in below would be sufficient and it is about as light as it gets. Two pieces on opposing sides would give great stability. Bon Appetit!
 

Iron_llama

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2020
Messages
970
Location
NW MN
I concur with the general consensus that cooking while up the tree is dicey. I have however done it. wedged a knock off jet boil in a crotch and fired 'er up. Once I heard it boiling I poured the water into my mountain house, tossed that back into my pack, waited for the burner to cool packed that up and started eating. Was simpler than rope climbing down and back up just to eat.

I in general don't do all day sits and I typically cook while moving between morning and evening stands. There is no way I would carry a separate shelf to cook on elevated. I would consider dropping down and cooking on my ambush, but I've been using stirrups lately so that's not really an option.

The addition of a lightweight cook kit and a good back pack really helps with hunting deeper. One of the main reasons I'm saddle hunting is the weight addition is minimal compared to the functionality. I plan on doing some overnights this coming year, will be way easier than packing back in there two mornings in a row.
If I did overnights, I'd definitely bring at least one way to boil water, if not two.
2 Power Bars, a couple of string cheeses and a 20oz thermos of coffee is about all the weight I‘m willing to add, but if I wanted a hot meal my vote would be for a thermos full of something. Too many negatives and fiddle factor with cooking in the tree for me. But if it increases the enjoyment for you, then by all means that is what you should do. I think a piece of paracord cinched 2/3 up the Jet Boil cup and clipped your hys strap so it would hang about 12in below would be sufficient and it is about as light as it gets. Two pieces on opposing sides would give great stability. Bon Appetit!
I do PB&J sammies, snack sticks, apples, Kleen Kanteen travel mug full of coffee or ginger tea, and maybe a thermos on top of that. I do carry a couple of lighters so I can start a fire if I get wet or chilled.

As an aside, the prospect of open flames melting expensive synthetic clothing is something that hunters might consider when considering wardrobe. If you're going to be cooking with flames, or anticipate campfires, maybe wool is better than technical synthetics. I'm getting a bit off-topic here but maybe not too far.
 

raisins

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2019
Messages
4,963
I remember the old MREs had a chemical warmer thing. Do they still make those, perhaps in civilian/more gourmet varieties? It seems like some hot lasagna out of a bag would hit the spot and no open flame.
 

neonomad

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2019
Messages
1,012
Well not gonna lie I think that is ridiculous but maybe equally ridiculous I impulsively bought a laptop sling like this thinking I could kill two birds with one stone and get work done in the tree. That turned out to be a half-baked idea, but it would give you a flat surface to work with as long as you don't dump it and end up with 3rd degree burns.

About 12 years ago I went off the deep end building a similar but more elaborate gizmo… honestly I should get it out and start using it again, it worked pretty good.85649387-E6DB-46EA-9CDF-F362C728A0E9.jpeg
 

TradBowGuy

New Member
Joined
Oct 23, 2021
Messages
29
Location
PA
Stanley thermos's for me-a 14 oz widemouth for the chili or soup, & a 20 oz for hot coffee. the 20 oz is cool-you just remove the cup & loosen the stopper to pour.

But if I'm staying on the ground, & walking back to camp...then I also take an 8 oz little guy that contains, um...wound disinfectant.

One can get some nasty cuts from those broadheads-best to be prepared! ;)
 
Top