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Help! Tired of Freezing Hands!

bj139

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Jun 13, 2019
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SE PA
I use these mostly to prevent rope burns but they provide some warmth while leaving my fingertips free to do almost everything.
 

Flint

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Nov 16, 2018
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Warsaw, NY 14569
I've been wondering if that mole skin raps for your sticks would help any. Would put a barier between the metal and your hands! Camo duct tape has helped some to.
 

Bach55

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Jul 24, 2019
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Indiana
I've been wondering if that mole skin raps for your sticks would help any. Would put a barier between the metal and your hands! Camo duct tape has helped some to.
Same. I have stealth strips but only on one side. So there is still a fair bit of metal I can end up touching.
 

redsquirrel

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I use the same pair of uninsulated gloves all season for quite a few years now. As soon as the weather starts getting cooler I start using my hand muff. As it gets cooler I'll throw either chemical handwarmers or an electric handwarmer in. When it starts to get really cold for the walk in and climbing up/down I will take the chemical handwarmers out and keep them in my gloves.
 

Archer19422

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Oct 10, 2020
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i have been using action battery operated gloves for the last 3 years cant beat them look them up on the web page action battery heated clothing the base layer is top of the line also
 

tmattson

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Jul 2, 2019
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South East Michigan
Ok so got my hands on a new Zippo Heatbank 9s hand warmer. Has a low, medium and high heat setting, and single or dual sides. I topped off a full charge on it, turned it on to high and dual sides. Pleasantly surprised how warm this gets, for sure warmer than the normal chemical hand warmers and warmer than both zippo fuel warmers I have. I expected to get maybe an hour with full blown settings, was going strong at 2 hours and 35 minutes. Granted this was in a warm house but I was very happy with that. It says up to 9 hours, on low one sided, may very well be legit. For me, think I would leave on low and then turn on high to get a good warmup on the hands. It is bigger than the Zippo fuel warmers so probably better suited for a hand muffs. They do make a smaller thinner one rated for same heat but only 3 hour rated. All in all I was surprised.
 

Bach55

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Jul 24, 2019
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I may have found a solution.

1) The electric hand warmer is definitely a huge benefit. Helped my hands stay much warmer throughout the hunt. Seems more economical than the traditional ones over the long run and also less fuss to deal with than opening them up etc.

2) Keeping the gloves I’m not wearing at a given moment stuffed into my jacket to keep them warm was very helpful. Putting on warm gloves Vs cold gloves at the end of a hunt helped. This is a big deal during duck hunting. Not sure why I had never read it across to deer hunting.

3) I bought some lined, full dip nitrile gloves for climbing. They worked great! They are almost impervious to the cold metal, plus they have great dexterity. I hate doing tasks with gloves on usually, but these made it easier due to the dexterity and the tackiness of the outer shell. I actually bought a nice pair of lined leather gloves ($70) and tested both holding some ice packs, and the $10 pair of nitrile gloves held off the ice just as well and had way more dexterity. Not to mention the large delta in price. Link to gloves:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004QXP5LG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glc_fabc_jg96Fb0MPNQ0F?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1
 

dalton916

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Sep 27, 2018
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2,475
First Lite merino fingerless gloves work fine for me. Wore them this weekend in 16° weather (I’m in SC. That’s frigid) and was find. Now with that said, I did keep my hands stuffed in a Sitka jacket most of the time, lol.

My recommendation for you would be the merino gloves as well, but put a hot hands under each wrist band (palm side.......) to warm the blood going to you hands.
 

five

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Oct 16, 2019
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298
I have great luck with these and some old thinsulate leather driving gloves. When it gets really cold I throw in some hot hands. Prefer the larger ones not the hand size ones.


The other day someone mentioned heated vests and someone recommended Volt branded ones on Amazon. That led me to finding some muffs that are rechargeable. Might look into that at some point.
 

Bango Skank

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Nov 1, 2020
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136
I think TNbowhunter nailed it.
One little possibility to consider is chemotherapy induced neuropathy. Or possibly whateverthefuckotherinduced neuropathy. All I know is my dad beat colon cancer 8 years ago but it still causes legit physical pain to his hands if he holds a cold drink or tries snow blowing the driveway before one of his sons get there. Stubborn old jarhead.
 

five

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Oct 16, 2019
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I lost 30% of my body weight at one point. Ever since that happened it has completely rewired me. Used to wear shorts and sandals year round in SC. Now I can’t drink ice water because I get the shakes from being so cold.
 

Fuse Dude

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Jan 6, 2020
Messages
59
Location
South Louisiana
Thin camo poly/spandex gloves (opt for insulated in really cold weather), leather work gloves, muff, and chem warmers. The chargeable hand warmers in a muff seems nice.

There seems to be a recurring theme of a three layered approach with a lil contingency built in for most people.

Stay toasty my friends!

:relaxed:
 

Nimbus1376

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Nov 21, 2020
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Lewisburg, PA
I think TNbowhunter nailed it.
One little possibility to consider is chemotherapy induced neuropathy. Or possibly whateverthefuckotherinduced neuropathy. All I know is my dad beat colon cancer 8 years ago but it still causes legit physical pain to his hands if he holds a cold drink or tries snow blowing the driveway before one of his sons get there. Stubborn old jarhead.
Platinum based chemotherapy agents are notorious for causing neuropathy and cold intolerance. Oxaliplatin is a mainstay in colon cancer treatment protocols and is platinum based. Thing that sucks is that the changes are irreversible. Gabapentin can be somewhat helpful. Maybe something to mention to your dad to look in to?
 

DMTJAGER

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Sep 4, 2018
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339
For the first 24 years as an heavy industrial electrician I worked outside every winter or in a 100% unheated building for at least 19 of those years and I have learned a thing or two about keeping your hands warm especially if like me you were in constant all day long contact with objects materials and tools made from metal mostly steel.
I also believe I have a freakishly high tolerance for cold and I'm sure being a large man with big hands helps to retain heat.

The best advice I can give any hunter who has difficulty or suffers from cold hands is work out a glove and or tubular insulated hand warmer and chemical hand warmer combination that solves your problems because I have been taking my sons deer hunting since they were 10 and brother let me tell you chemical hand warmers allowed many many hunt to remain enjoyable when it would've otherwise not been.
I would literally load my boys inner layers, boots gloves and even hats at times with Hot Hands chemical warmers and they really really do work.
Chemical hand warmers also do a pretty good job at warming up your sandwiches if you use them correctly.
A warm sandwich and cup of steaming hot chocolate will do great things for a 12 year olds moral when its 18* outside
 

JakeFromVirginia

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Nov 17, 2020
Messages
116
Are you keeping your neck and head covered? Majority of your body heat escapes from your head and your blood gets cold then circulates through your body and already cold fingers (same thing happens when you're hot and put your feet in cold water - cools you quickly).

I wear a neck gaiter that I can pull over my ears, then a beanie over my head, plus keep my jacket hood on. I keep my hands in my pockets with hand warmers and wear Merino Wool Liner Gloves. This works for me and I have along skinny fingers that freeze easily. Also, I put the hot hands together in one pocket on my ride to my spot and they warm each other and get super hot. Some days I use two hot hands for each pocket.

Also, are you sweating on your way in and after climbing the tree? It may seem just your hands are cold, but your hands and feet will feel cold first if your overall body temp goes down... If so, you may need to keep your heavy jacket off, wear a ball cap, etc. Then suit up after getting in the tree (jacket should be easy to put on in a saddle).

Don't google any medical ailments - 'cold hands' isn't as good of click bait as 'finger cancer' or whatever. The internet didn't go to med school for 4 years and then practice medicine for years after ;).
 
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