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Help! Tired of Freezing Hands!

Bach55

Active Member
SH Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2019
Messages
183
Location
Indiana
I’ve given up and am looking for some help. It seems that any time the temp gets down around 30 my hands absolutely freeze as I’m getting down from the tree. I’ll be fine for the entirety of the hunt, and then as I get down and get my gear together for the trip out my hands just freeze. I’m talking can’t feel the button on my headlamp or the zipper on my jacket freeze. Obviously they’re more exposed to the elements then, but I think touching ice cold climbing sticks is a big part of it as well. I used to get cold feet all the time, and I’ve made big strides on that front after reading recommendations on the forum. Hoping I can have a revelation on my hands as well! But Who knows....maybe I’m just a big ol wuss!!

I know people will ask about gloves etc. I’ve been using the First Lite merino liner gloves this year because last year I thought moisture may have been causing the issue. While they’re very light weight, they hold up surprisingly well up until closing time. I’ve tried layering them with heavier gloves as well, and it doesn’t seem to help. Anything too bulky makes it nearly impossible to get everything packed up anyways.

Look forward to hearing what you all do...
 

pesqimon

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SH Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2018
Messages
2,077
Location
Massachusetts
I’m interested to hear other theories. This happens to me too but I don’t think it’s especially due to lack of gloves etc. i think it is something physiological. Having to do with being still for so long and then moving and getting blood flowing to big muscles makes your hands cold. Needless to say I am talking out of my ass but that’s what I figure.
 

SaddleUpPartner!

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Joined
Jan 25, 2019
Messages
340
Location
Michigan
I’m interested to hear other theories. This happens to me too but I don’t think it’s especially due to lack of gloves etc. i think it is something physiological. Having to do with being still for so long and then moving and getting blood flowing to big muscles makes your hands cold. Needless to say I am talking out of my ass but that’s what I figure.
Whoa I thought I was the only one that this happens to! Yeah it’s like I’ve been on stand for 5 hours and hands are coldish. When I’m climbing down it’s like I put them in ice. I usually put my gloves in my coat near my chest so they’re nice and toasty when I put them back on. Also having a muff with a hand warmer in it makes a massive difference.
 

gameflogger

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SH Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2014
Messages
1,258
Location
Texas
I cannot stand wearing gloves, I clip a hand muff warmer to my bridge loops, it sits perfectly on my lap while hunting, but I am not hindered by thick gloves. I do not hunt as cold of climates as some guys on here do, but cold hands are cold hands. I have found that baselayers with thumbholes tend to help keep my hands warmer as well
 

Outdoorsman33

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2019
Messages
343
I agree with pesqimon to an extent it can be a physiological thing sometimes. But you should give a set of neoprene gloves a try. Depending on the quality some neoprene gloves once we5 can either freeze or stay warm.
 

sureshotscott

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SH Member
Joined
Jul 18, 2017
Messages
1,602
Location
SE MI
Usually I wear very light gloves for hunts in the 30-50 degree range, and use hand-warmers in pockets to keep my hands toasty. If the temps get lower I use the Super warmers--the big ones that stay warm about 16 hours or so.
 

ricky racer

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SH Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2016
Messages
2,047
Location
Niles/Buchanan, MI
Below is a post I made with my choice on gloves and liners. As stated in the post, when it gets colder out I use a muff attached to my bridge. It's hard to beat a good muff for cold weather. When it gets real cold, I'll break out rechargeable hand warmers, one for each hand and keep them in the muff. This morning it was in the teens and the glove/muff combination worked great. I didn't get cold enough to fire up the warmers. My hands stayed warm and toasty throughout the morning sit.

Regarding your prior cold feet, what did you come up with to cure them?

 
Last edited:

Babefa

New Member
SH Member
Joined
Oct 8, 2020
Messages
8
Location
Noble Co. Indiana
Fellow Hoosier here, I experienced the same issue, I dug out my old hand muff, stuffed two large "hot hand" packs in the muff. Issue solved. Hanging for a few hours in 30 deg. temps, the blood in your extremities will be pulled to your core to help regulate your core temp. (vaso-constriction) Vital organs require this for perfusion. Hands and feet; being the furthest from your core, will become cold the quickest. The old adage that you lose the most body heat through an uncovered head is patently false, that percentage of heat loss is percentages lower than first thought. Ambient air temp and any associated wind will wick away body heat at a rapid pace while hanging, even while wearing insulated layers. 'Windstopper' worn over feather down worn over merino wool is a good combo to combat that but your wallet will be a little lighter after those purchases.
 

raisins

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2019
Messages
2,276
I’ve given up and am looking for some help. It seems that any time the temp gets down around 30 my hands absolutely freeze as I’m getting down from the tree. I’ll be fine for the entirety of the hunt, and then as I get down and get my gear together for the trip out my hands just freeze. I’m talking can’t feel the button on my headlamp or the zipper on my jacket freeze. Obviously they’re more exposed to the elements then, but I think touching ice cold climbing sticks is a big part of it as well. I used to get cold feet all the time, and I’ve made big strides on that front after reading recommendations on the forum. Hoping I can have a revelation on my hands as well! But Who knows....maybe I’m just a big ol wuss!!

I know people will ask about gloves etc. I’ve been using the First Lite merino liner gloves this year because last year I thought moisture may have been causing the issue. While they’re very light weight, they hold up surprisingly well up until closing time. I’ve tried layering them with heavier gloves as well, and it doesn’t seem to help. Anything too bulky makes it nearly impossible to get everything packed up anyways.

Look forward to hearing what you all do...
Before your climb down, put Hot Hands warmers (I like Super Warmers) in the palm of your gloves. Take breaks on the way down, etc and pull your fingers into the gloves and squeeze the warmers and wait.

Also, a liner glove is not enough insulation for me for what you are doing. I would suggest some insulated work gloves or similar that allows enough dexterity (but all gloves hurt dexterity). My cold weather setup is glove liner and then neoprene gloves from Glacier Gloves. On stand, I keep my hands glove free and either in good pockets with a Hot Hands in each or both in a muff with one or more Hot Hands. It is important to start your climb with warm hands.

Packing up, etc with heavier gloves is slower, but if you are like me and get cold hands pretty easily, then you don't have much choice. Until aerogel gloves are a thing, thin gloves aren't warm. If you start using thicker gloves, it is like learning to type, you just dive in and soon it is easier.
 

Still Kicking

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SH Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2020
Messages
535
Location
Central Illinois
I wear the merino liner gloves in the 30's and after that I have to go to the muff with hot hands warmers. I carry a pair of thinsulate lined leather gloves for the climb down and walk out.
 

TNbowhunter

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SH Member
Joined
Mar 12, 2019
Messages
715
Location
Middle Tennessee
Reynauds sucks—I have it. The toughest thing about it is that once your hands get a chill, the vessels constrict and reduce blood flow to your hands... which makes your hands get colder.... which makes the vessels constrict more.... which makes your hands colder... You see where I’m going with this? There are three keys to managing it while hunting, in my opinion:
1. Keep your core warm. If your core is cold, your circulation will slow, expediting the vicious cycle above. Avoid that.
2. Keep your hands warm. Sounds obvious, but it’s so easy to let your hands get cold when it was preventable. Use a muff, keep your hands dry, wear good gloves, or whatever works for you—just don’t let them start getting cold. I am guilty of letting my hands get cold while looking at my phone instead of keeping them warm in my pockets, and I pay for it almost every time.
3. If your hands get cold, have an external heat source at the ready. If your circulation gets choked off, simply wearing big gloves won’t do—you can’t count on your hands to warm back up like other people’s do. I have grown to love using an electric hand warmer, but it can be as simple as stuffing your hands into your armpits or down your waders while duck hunting. You just need to find something outside your hands that can deliver consistent heat, or it’ll take FOREVER to get them warm again.
I hope this helps, and good luck!
 

tmattson

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SH Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2019
Messages
808
Location
South East Michigan
You nailed it for me. Was diagnosed with Raynaud's few years back, then about a year ago MDS and last May a BMT. My fingers get cold in cooler temps in October now. Once cold, only warmth help. I just tested some KUIU super down glomitts, sent them back. Just ordered a pair of zippo heatbank 9s to test. Thinking of trying the finger mitts also from Shiver Shield, they use aerogel but still a little bulky, nothing like the down glomitts though. BTE Shiver Shield is working on gloves I believe. I ordered a pair of the pants to test walks in the cold Michigan early mornings. Maybe test out a heated muff also.
 

Bach55

Active Member
SH Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2019
Messages
183
Location
Indiana
Great stuff. Thanks guys. Had never heard of Reynauds. Not sure if I have it or not, but it’s nice to know I’m not the only one who struggles with this. Honestly it has gotten to the point where I dread getting down in cold weather. The rest of my cold weather gear is dialed in, so I’ve got to get this figured out.

I like the idea of leather gloves. I think a big part of this is the exposure to cold metal, so my hope is that the leather will shield that better than fleece or some other synthetic material. I already use hand warmers when needed, and my hands are usually warm when I start down only to be numb within minutes. I’ll try and remember to report back on how it goes.
 

raisins

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SH Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2019
Messages
2,276
Great stuff. Thanks guys. Had never heard of Reynauds. Not sure if I have it or not, but it’s nice to know I’m not the only one who struggles with this. Honestly it has gotten to the point where I dread getting down in cold weather. The rest of my cold weather gear is dialed in, so I’ve got to get this figured out.

I like the idea of leather gloves. I think a big part of this is the exposure to cold metal, so my hope is that the leather will shield that better than fleece or some other synthetic material. I already use hand warmers when needed, and my hands are usually warm when I start down only to be numb within minutes. I’ll try and remember to report back on how it goes.
I was thinking: cold metal and working with your hands more elevated than they are when resting in the saddle (which decreases circulation via gravity). I know my feet get colder when I prop them up.
 

Bach55

Active Member
SH Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2019
Messages
183
Location
Indiana
Regarding your prior cold feet, what did you come up with to cure them?
@ricky racer

I bought the Wiggy’s lamilite bootys. And I owe you a big “thank you” for that because I believe your comments led me to researching them. They’re incredible. I now understand much better than foot warmth is all about moisture management, and those things are like insulated sponges! My feet still get cold but not nearly as severely as they used to.
 

Flint

Active Member
SH Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2018
Messages
168
Location
Warsaw, NY 14569
Missing fingers this has been a problem since I was 13 years old! MITTENS! Or a hand muff have been the only thing that has ever helped. You need to move your fingers together to keep circulation moving. The before prep is critical. Cold to start will freeze fast! As long as my fingers are nice and warm I can get down and pack up with jersey gloves on in sub 0 temps. But have to be warm first!
 
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