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Compounds vs Crossbows in a saddle

NWPA22

Member
Joined
Dec 14, 2018
Messages
99
Location
Pennsylvania
I have been hunting out of a saddle for 2 years with a compound. What are your thoughts or observations regarding the pros and cons of a compound vs crossbow in a saddle. It seems the limbs on a crossbow would be tough to maneuver, although I see they are making them slimmer widths now.
 

woodsdog2

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2019
Messages
2,003
Generally, I prefer the vertical bow over a "normal" style Horizontal Xbow as I just think that to me personally, they are much easier to move around in the tree. The front heavy standard-horizontal crossbow configuration is a bit bulkier and front heavy and I don't find it as nimble or manageable as my vertical bow. That being said, I have been spring turkey hunting with the Hickory Creek Mini-Crossbow this year and it is a vertical crossbow and to me, mimics much of the maneuverability of a vertical bow. I am also thinking that the Darton Toxin, Scorpyd, Mission, Raven which have a narrow axel to axel width and more of a bullpup design may be a bit more manageable than your run of the mill crossbows but I do not own any of those. To me, the Hickory Creek Mini seems to be the most manageable but I have not hunted out of a saddle with mine yet. In a pop up blind so far very balanced and to me, none of the front heavy bulk of your more standard crossbow type configurations.
 

philsanchez76

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
May 20, 2019
Messages
690
Location
TN
Generally, I prefer the vertical bow over a "normal" style Horizontal Xbow as I just think that to me personally, they are much easier to move around in the tree. The front heavy standard-horizontal crossbow configuration is a bit bulkier and front heavy and I don't find it as nimble or manageable as my vertical bow. That being said, I have been spring turkey hunting with the Hickory Creek Mini-Crossbow this year and it is a vertical crossbow and to me, mimics much of the maneuverability of a vertical bow. I am also thinking that the Darton Toxin, Scorpyd, Mission, Raven which have a narrow axel to axel width and more of a bullpup design may be a bit more manageable than your run of the mill crossbows but I do not own any of those. To me, the Hickory Creek Mini seems to be the most manageable but I have not hunted out of a saddle with mine yet. In a pop up blind so far very balanced and to me, none of the front heavy bulk of your more standard crossbow type configurations.
+1 on the Hickory Creek Mini. Don't think a traditional horizontal x bow would feel very natural in a saddle. Other way around, if you were hunting out of a ladder stand or something, the horizontal x bow would be better cuz you could rest it on a cross bar or something.
 

SNIPERBBB

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2020
Messages
501
Location
SE Ohio
Older xbows could be a bit more awkward as they have longer limbs. Got a tenpoint accudraw a few years ago and it's not much more awkward than a gun. And it's got better things to tie your now hoist to than a gun does.

The xbow does allow you to take more awkward angle shots than a compound does. Just gotta be careful not to bang the limbs on a limb or tree trunk when you fire.
 

sojourner

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2014
Messages
1,366
I use a child’s crossbow. Short and not too wide. If I had the scratch, I would order one of these when they come out.

 

FishBlood&RiverMud

New Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2020
Messages
39
Location
Wisconsin/Minnesota
My first year with a crossbow i spent a lot of time just holding it in a shooting position to develop the muscle memory to get used to the oddball weighting. In the living room holding dead center on a target at 5 yrds is good practice, well, better than none at all that is for sure.

I have a Raving R10, and it still felt wide...Because it is wider than anything i've ever pulled the trigger on. Didn't take long to get used to it and to be able to hit bullseye at 60 yds standing unsupported. I also shot a ton the first year to develop that natural memory.

In a tree, being aware of how the limbs open during firing is all you need to be concerned about, well that and being conscious that you are holding something under extreme load that could break and release that pent up energy at any moment - mind your limbs!
 

sdoyle1

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Dec 23, 2019
Messages
409
I preordered a killer instinct swat x1. It’s very narrow and I believe it’s the shortest crossbow on the market. I currently have a carbon express piledriver 390 crossbow but opted to use my compound for all of my saddle hunts last season because of the size of it. I believe the small size of the killer instinct will make crossbow hunting out of the saddle a lot easier.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

dlist777

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 21, 2019
Messages
699
I've hunted with a xbow for the last 2 years. I have a Ravin and it's no issue. But, I do think the ones with wider limbs would be harder. Not impossible, but more to think about when you're going through a shot (making sure limbs clear). The R10 is like 6 inches cocked and 10 uncocked. So each axle is only moving 2 inches outward when you pull the trigger. If you have 2 inches of room you're good. I don't even think about it. I'm generally shooting a little back from the tree so it's never an issue for me.

But, of course, a compound or the hickory creek is going to have that advantage...
 

HuumanCreed

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2020
Messages
586
I shot my Barnett Jackal a few times from the saddle, its not as maneuverable as a compound but its not a deal breaker either. There are some clearance issues but its actually not that bad due to it being in a 'defined' state where the strings are already cocked. In the beginning with my compound bow in a saddle I did hit my bridge or tether a few times drawing back. But one time I didn't take into account of the limbs expanding and did hit my tether. But with practice (or money, as in Ravin) all things can be suited to what you want to do.
 
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