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Tell me about Mammut Smart 2.0

Bondy OutdoorsTV

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Mar 14, 2022
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11:00 minute mark
thank you….I watched that video before, purchased the Smart 2.0, but just didn’t really love the way it worked for rappelling…tried several caribeaners including using the one used in the video, but it didn’t work as expected…same Canyon C-IV rope too….
 

Bondy OutdoorsTV

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Mar 14, 2022
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I felt like I really had to crank the device (rotate it with my non dominant hand) just to break the friction then I didn’t have any control with my dominant hand on the tag end of the rope…to someone that uses this device successfully as a quick rappelling device can you make a video to demonstrate?
 

Exhumis

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thank you….I watched that video before, purchased the Smart 2.0, but just didn’t really love the way it worked for rappelling…tried several caribeaners including using the one used in the video, but it didn’t work as expected…same Canyon C-IV rope too….
Did you try it with the mammut biner?
 

Brocky

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Static ropes are harder to control than a more flexible rope. The hand you use to lever the device is also the brake hand, with the other going above. A hitch above it can be used to share the load for a smoother ride.
 

Bondy OutdoorsTV

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I bought a Kong oval beaner that I’m going o try with it. also a friction hitch above to try to smooth out the ride down- stay tuned for latest results
 

Brocky

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The Michoacán is a nice hitch to use, the legs are spread if it is in the correct orientation, and is easier to release. An interesting side note, twin 6mm ropes must bear against the side plates enough so that it acts like a rope grab. There is no slipping until the device is levered, the ropes only need to hang over the end.
 

TommyDee

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The Michoacán is a nice hitch to use, the legs are spread if it is in the correct orientation, and is easier to release. An interesting side note, twin 6mm ropes must bear against the side plates enough so that it acts like a rope grab. There is no slipping until the device is levered, the ropes only need to hang over the end.
I’m experimenting with this as my 2tc setup, 6 mm on canyon IV. 2 short practice climb/rappels, seems workable, quiet, tends the hitch nicely on ascend when I need to snug up the hitch the first few moves.…but Not as smooth as a mechanical device. I have a swabisch, and it was harder than I’d like to break a few times on rappel, but I’m hoping Michoacán will solve.
for me, has some promise, but I’m also just learning this method. if it’s quiet, very safe (can suspend from) and foolproof (can decide to rappel fast with no changeover) I maybe can live with a jerky but safe rappel… I’ll post back here in a few weeks time if I can get out in April, but probably it will be May.
 

Marmuzz

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Feb 22, 2021
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I have found that using twin 6-7mm lines is the only reliable way to hang in it solo, maybe the sideways pressure helps. If you hang on your rappel line the hitch above, you can instantly descend to ground. A Figure 8 can be used the same way and doesn’t put a bend in the rope, which is helpful if using your foot as an ascender.
View attachment 60825
@Brocky in this picture, on right, do you how many inches long the TRC cord is forming the hitch above the Smart?

(I’ve been testing tying a distel and think it’d work great for this situation. However all my TRC cords are 4’, that’s why I ask. Even tying a dummy distel with some 1/4” work rope at 36” length seemed too long. But I don’t have the Smart yet so I’m just guessing on tail lengths above a carabiner currently.)
 

Brocky

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That is a spliced cord 19 1/2” long, I tied a couple eyes in a piece 4’ long and it was too long, so you definitely have long enough.
 

Marmuzz

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Feb 22, 2021
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@Brocky thanks that’s helpful. I realized after posting the question that your cord has spliced eyes and I’m tying my eyes with knots (scaffolds). But I’ll aim for ≈ 20” wrapped cord length plus some for the knots and see how it fits.
 

Marmuzz

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Feb 22, 2021
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I’m experimenting with this as my 2tc setup, 6 mm on canyon IV. 2 short practice climb/rappels, seems workable, quiet, tends the hitch nicely on ascend when I need to snug up the hitch the first few moves.…but Not as smooth as a mechanical device. I have a swabisch, and it was harder than I’d like to break a few times on rappel, but I’m hoping Michoacán will solve.
for me, has some promise, but I’m also just learning this method. if it’s quiet, very safe (can suspend from) and foolproof (can decide to rappel fast with no changeover) I maybe can live with a jerky but safe rappel… I’ll post back here in a few weeks time if I can get out in April, but probably it will be May.
@TommyDee had a chance to try this out? Any report?
 

Marmuzz

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Feb 22, 2021
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I picked one of these up from another user and was able to test it last night in my backyard near ground level. It was frustrating on multiple levels. I'll get into some of the other reasons why in a later post. But I had a short, hard fall which scared me pretty good. In hindsight, it was a real dummy moment but I wanted to expound on it critically to help anybody else who might be reading this, if you're thinking about trying the Smart 2.0.

For reference, I had Canyon Elite 9mm rope with a Black Diamond (Rocklock?) carabiner. No friction hitch.

I was standing one my one-stick platform about 3-4 above grade. Leaning into my saddle, because of the device's location on the rope in relation to my tether girth hitch, I was able to go hands free and the device held me. Cool, I thought. I figured I'd stand up, see how the device released when unloaded, climb down my stick, and (I expected!) the device to bite the rope again when I increased distance from its position on the rope. However, when it unloaded, it slipped down way more than I anticipated, and unfortunately this happened as I was fishing with my foot for the step below my platform. So just as I needed a little tension, it began slipping down the rope, and almost instantly, so was I. I went down fast and landed on my back.

Fortunately, it wasn't a long fall but it almost knocked the wind out of me, and jarred my back. It took me a few moments to get put back together. It was a stark reminder gravity acts fast and can have drastic consequences. Practice, think carefully, and stay safe, everybody.

After mulling this over, I think this fall happened for one or multiple reasons:

  1. Bridge length. This device is intended to be used on an RCH belay loop, which only affords a few inches until the carabiner and device must engage the rope in the event of a fall. However, a saddle bridge can have entire feet of play, in multiple directions, plus those same additional inches. Probably my bridge never got taut, which allowed the carabiner to lay sideways and/or slide down (on my bridge towards the lineman loop) and never pull straight. I do recall during the fall (time moves fast and slow simultaneously) wondering why the Smart was not grabbing because it was in the proper orientation (nose tipping to 4-5 o'clock). Regardless, the carabiner probably wasn't exerting force on the bottom and forcing the Smart to engage the rope.
  2. Carabiner selection. Mammut advises this device be used with an HMS style carabiner; and particularly their special carabiner with a crossgate made for the Smart. I would like to get a Black Diamond Gridlock carabiner to keep the rope secured at the bottom of the biner and see how it helps.
  3. Rope tension. This device is intended to be used with a control hand constantly on the tag end of your rope. An autoblock or similar friction hitch on your right lineman's loop would mimic this. I went hands free, no friction hitch, and momentarily was lulled into thinking I was safe when I was leaning in my saddle, causing the device to engage. But as soon as I stood up, of course the slack allowed things to slide.
In summary, I don't recommend using this device without a friction hitch- in case anyone is thinking about trying it. Hopefully my over-analyzation can help somebody. I'm just glad I tried this near ground level before trying to one stick it 10-20' up.

Like I said, I'll get into some of my other experiences with the Smart in a later post, but for now, I wanted to mention this because I thought it was important enough to merit its own post.
 

Marmuzz

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I also toyed with two friction hitch setups using Sterling 6mm TRC. Here's what I found:

Distel hitch above device (see @Brocky photos in earlier posts)
I thought before I bought the Smart this was going to my setup. I would love for it to work. It felt the most secure when I was hanging from it, and I think it'd be very ideal for one stick climbing. However, getting the Smart to tend the Distel did not work well. I had to pull the rope tag end straight up parallel with the tether, and HARD. Sometimes it would effortlessly push the hitch up. Other times, for reasons I don't understand, the hitch would stubbornly jam. When this happened, adjusting everything to get it to move again was a real pain. Not ideal if you're trying to quickly eliminate slack to reduce fall risk. On rappel, pinching the Distel worked, but boy did the cord ever creak and groan when I would go hands free and it would seize up. Not a comforting feeling. Also, I found I had to wear leather gloves to pinch it on the way down. Otherwise I got rope burn. Ultimately, I began to think it'd be easier, cheapier, and quieter to ditch the Smart altogether, just pair a knot tender with the Distel, and climb/rappel on that alone.

Klemheist on right LB loop (see @valerio024 video)
This worked pretty well with about 8-12"
rope slack between the Smart and the Klemheist, and felt reasonbly secure—probably because this is closest to how the device is intended to be used. The friction hitch pulling the rope downwards helps tip the device nose down, which encourages it to bite the rope. If when untensioned the device slips, it's not long before the friction hitch engages, again causing the device to engage. Letting rope out is easy. Tip the device, and then let a little more slack out on the Klemheist. Taking rope in is a little trickier. You can do it, but to have enough rope to tug up and move up the device, you have to increase your slack between the device and Klemheist. However, then when it's moved up as you want it, the device wants to slide down again because of your slack.

What I found worked best was with my right hand, pull the rope up to adjust the device location, then immediately pull the tag end straight down to make the Smart bite turn and bite on the rope, grab the rope with my left hand, let go with my right, and then with my right hand tighten up the slack on the Klemheist. (This last part is dramatically easier with a small piece of paracord for a tender.)

I think using this device effectively and safely is all about slack management. I'm cautious but curious to try the Klemheist method actually one-stick climbing. I'll report back after trying that.
 

Brocky

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The Distel and Klemheist, as well as others, seem to trap the tension in the wraps when trying to move them. The Michoacán tends and releases easier, and the two legs are spread, so they don’t interfere with the device.
 

Marmuzz

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Feb 22, 2021
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The Distel and Klemheist, as well as others, seem to trap the tension in the wraps when trying to move them. The Michoacán tends and releases easier, and the two legs are spread, so they don’t interfere with the device.
I will try that next then. Unlike many friction hitches I don’t readily find instructions for tying a Mich online. Does this image look correct to you?
910CF5AD-A5D7-4E50-8CB7-7650EECE689A.jpg
 
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