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The JRB Climbing Method

arm breaker

Well-Known Member
SH Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2019
Messages
515
Location
Arkansas
John, how long are you making the Garda foot loop from the webbing now that you’ve integrated the best friend into it? I got my webbing in yesterday and when I get some time I want to make my loops.

Another question I’ve been wanting to ask relates to the two Michoacán cords. Any reason why one couldn’t use eye to eye cords there if they were long enough instead of joining them with the bend as you do? I’ve got a few VT Prusiks I could potentially use for this if they are long enough.
 
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John RB

New Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2021
Messages
31
Location
Fort Washington, PA
John, how long are you making the Garda foot loop from the webbing now that you’ve integrated the best friend into it? I got my webbing in yesterday and when I get some time I want to make my loops.

Another question I’ve been wanting to ask relates to the two Michoacán cords. Any reason why one couldn’t use eye to eye cords there if they were long enough instead of joining them with the bend as you do? I’ve got a few VT Prusiks I could potentially use for this if they are long enough.
The end of season footloop was made from 16 feet of webbing. (We can always trim a little but we can't put it back). The part holding the beaners is exactly like in the video. And then I use two independent overhand knots capturing all 4 strands to set the foot loops. The Youtube shows one figure 8 and one overhand, and I found it be be overkill, but you can judge yours based on how thick the webbing is and how it holds. Note that in the original version, with my foot in the loop, it only came just past my knee. But after the elimination of a separate set of friction hitches for the 'best friend system', in the end of season version, I had lengthened the footloop so that the beaners reach my waist or actually my belly button, and for this (unlikely) self rescue scenario: Lets say a friction hitch failed completely, or even both of them, although that would be pretty close to a statistical impossibility. In a DRT system with no redundancy, we would already be on the ground... but in the JRB system, we only fall about a foot and the garda hitch (still engaged) catches us via our redundant bridge connection. Ok great, you are alive. Now how do ya get down? How do you self rescue? There are two options: 1) break the garda. Now, you will read that this is impossible, but I did figure out a way, and I could show ya, and I will eventually, but its not the preferred option, and requires some technique and thats not something we wanna worry about in a rescue situation. 2) This is the preferred option: Whip out an extra prussik loop that's in your saddle bag and tie a simple klemheist friction hitch onto one or BOTH lines (whatever failed) and your bridge. You have just repaired your system. Now, because your foot loop is longer, you can still get a foot in it and manage to take your load off the best friend, set the klemheist and now it will hold you. Then ya remove the garda and proceed with rappel as per your normal method.

Full disclosure: I am experimenting with a flat/hard bottom foot loop. I actually built 3 of them this weekend, and am still tuning, but I believe that WILL be replacing the loops for me, cuz I do not use a platform. If you use a platform, you may not be be interested in the extra bulk. But if you do, it will be easy to convert yours because it uses less webbing.

As for the eye-to-eye instead of a loop, yes, that will work fine, and some are using that. The only disadvantages are:
1. They take wear in the SAME spot all the time and cannot be 'walked around' to more evenly redistribute wear.
2. When you set your rope in the tree before climbing, ONE of your two friction hitches has to go to go up and over the crotch and back down. And you don't want it getting stuck in the crotch. Because I use a loop, i simply clip that loop into the clip at the end of my climbing line. it also gets the paracord loop. And so I never worry about that getting lost in the crotch. You will need to fashion something on the ends to get the same effect and make sure you don't lose it in the crotch.
3. You wont be able to fine tune the length. For example, during the season last year, I started lengthening the bridge of my saddle for comfort reasons (less hip pinch). Well that means I had to shorten my Michoacan loops so they remained at the right height.
 

John RB

New Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2021
Messages
31
Location
Fort Washington, PA
And so I have had quite a lot of fun preparing for the content of this video. Next, I will be providing details on how to construct the system. And then a series on the JRB Hitch Climbing method. I think that will really be cool to watch. I am having quite a bit of fun with this. "JRB Tree Climbing and Saddle Hunting" : Its a Facebook group and a YouTube Channel.
 
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